FaithWorld

U.S. Presbyterian Church rejects gay marriage proposal

By Reuters Staff
July 7, 2012

(A same-sex couple marries in New York, June 20, 2012. REUTERS/Adrees Latif )

The U.S. Presbyterian Church on Friday narrowly rejected a proposal by same-sex marriage proponents for a constitutional change that would redefine marriage as a union between “two people,” rather than between a woman and a man.

The 338-308 vote followed nearly four hours of heated debate at the Church’s General Assembly in Pittsburgh, a biennial gathering to review policy.

The Church, with around 2 million members, currently allows ministers to bless gay unions but prohibits them from solemnizing homosexual civil marriages.

Opponents of the change argued the move would alienate the Church from Presbyterian churches in other countries, while backers said it should be a leader in advocating for the acceptance of same-sex marriage.

Michael Wilson, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, told the General Assembly the proposal threatened to “tear the Church apart.”

But Piper Madison, from North Alabama Presbytery, said “the Church doesn’t ask us to do what others approve of, it asks us to do what is right.”

Read the full story by Matt Stroud here.
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Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Why is it that none of these christian “religions” ever hold a meeting to reject divorce????

Posted by wrpa | Report as abusive
 

wrpa,
Jesus already confirmed the brokenness of divorce, so it really isn’t necessary for Christians to meet to reject something that is already confirmed as broken. And, regarding the other brokenness discussed in the article, Jesus said not a letter of the Law will pass away until heaven and earth passes away. So, really, they didn’t need to meet about this either.

Posted by GoodnzGracious | Report as abusive
 

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