FaithWorld

Qatar TV Ramadan series on Muslim caliph stirs arguments across the Arab world

By Reuters Staff
August 13, 2012

(Tomb of Caliph Omar in Al-Masjid al-Nabawi, Medina, Saudi Arabia, 31 Dec 2006/Mohammad Adil.)

A television drama about the life of a seventh century Muslim ruler, Omar Ibn al-Khattab, is polarising opinion across the Arab world by challenging a widespread belief that actors should not depict Islam’s central figures.

Conservative clerics denounce the series, which is running during the region’s busiest drama season, the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Scholars see an undesirable trend in television programming; the foreign minister of the United Arab Emirates has publicly refused to watch it.

But at dinner tables and on social media around the region, “Omar” is winning praise among many Muslim viewers, who admire it for tackling an important period in Islam’s history. Some think it carries lessons for the Arab world, which is grappling with political change unleashed by last year’s uprisings.

Salam Sarhan, a columnist at the Lebanese newspaper Diyar, said the show was part of a gradual trend for the Islamic world to re-examine its heritage more critically, and would open the door for more television and cinema productions depicting central figures in Islam.

“If anyone dared to depict these figures 20 years ago, he would have been accused of blasphemy,” he wrote. “Simply put, depicting these revered figures with their mistakes, limitations, rivalries, anger, hunger and thirst will thrust Islamic societies into a new phase.”

Read the full story by Mahmoud Habboush here.
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