FaithWorld

Thousands rally in Tunisia for women’s rights, against Islamist reforms

By Reuters Staff
August 14, 2012

(A woman carries a banner and shout slogans during a demonstration in Tunis August 13, 2012.  REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi)

Thousands of Tunisians have rallied to protest against what they see as a push by the Islamist-led government for constitutional changes that would degrade women’s status in one of the Arab world’s most liberal nations.

The protest on Monday, by some 6,000 mostly Tunisian women, is the latest twist in a row over the role of Islam in a constitution being drawn up by a new assembly.

Tunisia’s ruling Ennahda Movement is under pressure from both hardline Salafi Muslims, calling for the introduction of Islamic law, and secular opposition parties.

Activists are not happy with a stipulation in a draft of the constitution that considers women to be “complementary to men” and want a pioneering 1956 law that grant women full equality with men to remain in place.

The protesters marched across main thoroughfares in the capital Tunis to demand that the government, led since October by Islamist moderates Ennahda, turn its attention instead to basic issues such as unemployment and regional development.

They carried banners that read “Rise up women for your rights to be enshrined in the constitution” and “Ghannouchi clear off, Tunisian women are strong”, referring to Ennahda’s leader Rachid Ghannouchi.

Read the full story by Tarek Amara here.
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One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

Its great the Tunisians getting support. It does make me sick when I hear how religion is oppresing other human beings in a negative way! I support the portestors 110% – they are taking on the Ennahda Movement.

Posted by LimoHire | Report as abusive
 

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