FaithWorld

Dubai police chief says Muslim Brotherhood sows subversion in the Gulf

April 3, 2013

(Dubai’s police chief Dhahi Khalfan poses at his office during an interview with Reuters in Dubai April 2, 2013. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

Sunni Muslim-ruled Gulf Arab states are often wary of subversion from their powerful Shi’ite neighbour Iran, but Dubai’s veteran police chief reserves most of his wrath for the “dictators” of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Dhahi Khalfan’s suspicions focus mostly on the Egyptian branch of the Sunni Islamist organisation, propelled to power in the most populous Arab country in elections since the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak in a popular uprising in 2011.

“The Brotherhood as a ruling party in Egypt has no right to interfere with other countries. They are no longer a political party and should respect the independence of other countries,” Khalfan told Reuters in an interview this week.

He reiterated charges that Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood was linked to an alleged plot to topple the UAE government, saying the group’s ultimate goal was Islamist rule in all Gulf states.

Khalfan, who has often railed against the Brotherhood on his Twitter account, is one of only a few UAE officials to speak publicly about politics.

While he says his tweets are personal views, diplomats say they reflect concerns among the UAE ruling elite about the regional popularity of Islamists and the possibility that the West will engage with them.

Khalfan complained that the West “sympathises, adopts and supports” the Brotherhood, saying he did not understand why.

Read the full story by Mirna Sleiman and William Maclean here.
.
Follow RTRFaithWorld via Twitter Follow all posts on Twitter @ RTRFaithWorld

rss button Follow all posts via RSS

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/