FaithWorld

Tunisian Salafists storm female student hostel to stop dancing

By Reuters Staff
April 19, 2013

(Tunisian Salafi Islamists wave flags inscribed with Islamic verses during a demonstration in Tunis September 7, 2012. REUTERS/Anis Mili )

Hardline Islamists threw stones and bottles at young women in a student hostel in Tunis to stop them staging a performance of dance and music, witnesses said on Thursday, in another blow to secular freedoms in the country that spawned the Arab Spring.

Since secular dictator Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali fell two years ago in the first of multiple revolts across the Arab world, moderate Islamists have won election and radical Muslims have targeted symbols of a hitherto mainly secular society.

Female university students housed at the Bardo district hostel in the capital were just starting a weekly show of dance and music on Wednesday evening when dozens of hardline Salafists broke into the premises after scaling its walls, witnesses said.

“They smashed windows on our building and threw stones and bottles at the students, stopping the performance,” said Rim Nsairi, one of the students, who are aged 19 to 24.

The disturbance lasted almost an hour before the assailants fled. There were no serious injuries and no arrests.

“This is unacceptable … The police were present and did not move. It just raises anger and fear,” said Ameni, another student who did not want her last name used. The Interior Ministry, which runs the police, had no immediate comment.

Read the full story by Tarek Amara here.
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One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

It’s funny the same salafists were asking for women to have the “freedom” to wear the veil at a university. Every so-called “revolution” in the middle east only appears to show the countries going backwards than forwards.

Posted by TurboDally | Report as abusive
 

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