FaithWorld

Tokyo governor sorry for remarks on Muslims, Istanbul and Olypmic bids

By Reuters Staff
April 30, 2013

(Tokyo Governor Naoki Inose (C) is surrounded by media as he speaks to reporters at Tokyo Metropolitan Government headquarters in Tokyo April 30, 2013. REUTERS/Yuya Shino)

Tokyo’s outspoken governor, Naoki Inose, who heads the city’s bid for the 2020 Olympics, apologized on Tuesday for “inappropriate” comments he made about rival candidate Istanbul and Islamic countries.

The remarks, made in a recent New York Times interview, prompted the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to investigate, while Turkey’s sports minister said they were “unfair and disheartening” and “did not comply with the spirit of the values of the Olympic Movement”.

“Islamic countries, the only thing they share in common is Allah and they are fighting with each other, and they have classes,” Inose, who was elected Tokyo governor last year, said in the interview.

“For the athletes, where will be the best place to be? Well, compare the two countries where they have yet to build infrastructure, very sophisticated facilities,” he said.

Tokyo is competing with Istanbul and Madrid to hold the Olympics for a second time after becoming the first Asian city to host the multi-sport event in 1964. Istanbul is bidding for a fifth time after its previous campaigns were unsuccessful.

“I said that Islamic countries fight, it was an inappropriate remark and I want to correct it,” Inose told reporters at the Tokyo Metropolitan Government building on Tuesday.
Read the full story by Antoni Slodkowski here.
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