Divided Church of England renews pledge to ordain women bishops

By Reuters Staff
July 9, 2013

(The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, attends his enthronement ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, southern England March 21, 2013. REUTERS/Toby Melville )

The Church of England’s law-making body voted on Monday in favor of ordaining women bishops, but it will be at least two years before the measure, opposed by a minority of traditionalists, can be passed.

The vote was a boost for Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby who became head of the 80 million-member Anglican church in January, a few weeks after a blocking minority defeated the last attempt to allow women bishops in the English church, after 10 years of divisive debate.

After several hours of talks in York at the Anglican body’s national assembly, the General Synod, members voted overwhelmingly to pursue reforms to allow women bishops as a “matter of urgency”.

A committee will draft legislation that will be reviewed later this year but it is not likely to be given final approval before November 2015.

” affirms an inclusive approach that is consistent with our previous resolution: the commitment to ordaining women bishops on exactly the same basis as men, and the flourishing together of all parts of the Church,” said Welby, 57, who is seeking to modernize the image of the church.

Dozens of Synod members spoke to urge the Church to move forward from the “train crash” of November’s shock result at the assembly – when a decision to ordain women bishops failed by six votes – and to return to a “path of reconciliation”.

Read the full story by Adam Jourdan here.

Follow RTRFaithWorld via Twitter Follow all posts on Twitter @ RTRFaithWorld

rss button Follow all posts via RSS

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/