FaithWorld

Al Qaeda group kidnaps Italian Jesuit Paolo Dall’Oglio in Syria: activists

July 29, 2013

(A medic inspects the damage at Raqqa national hospital, hit by what activists said was a Syrian Air Force fighter jet loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in Raqqa province, eastern Syria June 20, 2013. Picture taken June 20, 2013. REUTERS/Nour Fourat)

Al Qaeda-linked fighters in the rebel-held eastern Syrian city of Raqqa on Monday abducted a prominent Italian Jesuit priest who championed the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad, activists said.

Members of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant kidnapped Father Paolo Dall’Oglio while he was walking in the city, which had fallen under the control of militant Islamist brigades, the sources in Raqqa province told Reuters.

Syrian authorities expelled Dall’Oglio from the country last year after he helped victims of Assad’s military crackdown from a monastery in the Anti-Lebanon mountains north of Damascus.

via Al Qaeda group kidnaps Italian priest in Syria: activists | Reuters.

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Hello. It’s time to wake up. “Anti-Assad activists” are those working towards overthrowing secular Syria for an Islamist one. The Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamists use buzzwords they know will resonate with westerners, “freedom”, “democracy”. What they are really after is freedom to establish their twisted and medieval form of Islam and Sharia and democracy for all good submissive Sunnis. Under Assad, there was tolerance and respect for other religions and minorities, equal rights for women, 17% of GDP spent on secular education, and a democratically elected parliament who in turn elected the president who’s election was in turn ratified by the people. Stop acting like the opposition is legitimate. They are thugs who brought in mujahedeen from all over the world to establish a caliphate state for the Saudis and to eliminate competition for Qatar from Iran.

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