Myanmar Buddhist committee bans anti-Muslim organisations

By Reuters Staff
September 11, 2013

(Muslim people clear the area and search for salvageable items, after their houses were burnt in a riot at Htan Kone village, in Myanmar’s northern Sagaing region August 26, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun)

A government-appointed body that oversees Myanmar’s Buddhist monkhood has issued a directive intended to check the influence of a monk-led movement accused of stoking violence against minority Muslims.

At least 237 people have died in sectarian violence since June last year and more than 150,000 have been displaced. The vast majority of the victims were Muslim.

The bloodshed, mirrored by increasing attacks on Muslims in Buddhist-majority Sri Lanka, has threatened to undermine political and economic reforms the government initiated two years ago after half a century of military rule.

In an order dated September 2, the State Sangha Maha Nayaka Committee of monks responsible for regulating the Buddhist clergy prohibited the creation of formal organisations based around the 969 movement.

“They didn’t receive any permission, yet they want to form an organisation and make nationality-protection laws,” Ashin Baddanda Guna Linkara, the committee’s vice-chairman for Yangon, told Reuters.

The committee did not object to monks promoting the 969 ideology, which urges Buddhists to protect their faith against a perceived threat from Islam, he said, but the movement’s leaders had gone too far by drafting proposed laws, including one that would stop Buddhist women marrying outside their religion.

The numerals 969, which refer to the attributes of the Buddha, his teachings and the monkhood, have come to symbolise a movement aimed at isolating Muslims, who make up 5 percent of Myanmar’s 60 million people.

Read the full story by Jared Ferrie and Min Zayar Oo here.

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