FaithWorld

UK’s Marks and Spencer apologises after Muslim worker refused to sell alcohol

December 24, 2013

(A pedestrian carrying an M&S plastic bag walks past a Marks & Spencer shop in Brussels April 11, 2001. REUTERS/Thierry Roge)

Retailer Marks and Spencer apologised on Monday to customers angered after a Muslim checkout worker refused to sell champagne for religious reasons.

Thousands of customers threatened to boycott M&S, Britain’s biggest clothing retailer that also sells food, after a till worker in a London store asked a customer to wait as she would not handle champagne and called for another staff member.

Following a storm of protests on social media, M&S apologised for the “confusion”, saying it was not M&S’s policy to allow checkout staff to refuse to serve customers buying items like alcohol and pork which are forbidden in Islam.

A spokeswoman said the company’s policy for many years had been to try to accommodate staff of all religions by finding them roles where conflicts would not arise.

“On this occasion this person’s preferences were not taken into account and she ended up on the tills, which was a mistake,” the spokeswoman said. “We would like to apologise for any resulting confusion and reassure our customers that this was an isolated incident.”

Despite the apology, angry customers vented on M&S’s Facebook page, some calling on people to boycott the retailer and questioning whether other religions would get such leeway.

Read the full story here.

Follow RTRFaithWorld via Twitter Follow all posts on Twitter @ RTRFaithWorld

rss button Follow all posts via RSS

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

This is blatant segregating, and really not the way forward at all.

If you don’t agree with these products then don’t put yourself in front of them, and find a job elsewhere, ideally in a muslim country that will pander to your beliefs, like Syria or Iraq for instance.

Posted by RMSTitanic | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/