FaithWorld

Google loses bid to keep anti-Islamic video on YouTube during court order appeal

By Reuters Staff
March 1, 2014

(Cindy Lee Garcia (L), an actress in the “Innocence of Muslims”, and her lawyer M. Cris Armenta hold a news conference after a court hearing in Los Angeles, California September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Bret Hartman )

Google Inc on Friday lost its bid to keep an anti-Islamic film on its YouTube video sharing website while it appealed a federal appeals court order that the company said would have “devastating effects” if allowed to stand.

Earlier this week, a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals voted 2-1 to reject Google’s assertion that the removal of the film “Innocence of Muslims,” which sparked protests across the Muslim world, amounted to a prior restraint of speech that violated the U.S. Constitution.

In a court filing on Thursday, Google argued that the video should remain accessible to the public while it asks that a larger, 11-judge 9th Circuit panel review the issue. Google called this week’s opinion “unprecedented” and “sweeping.”

However, the 9th Circuit on Friday rejected Google’s request in a brief order. Google representatives could not immediately be reached for comment.

The plaintiff, Cindy Lee Garcia, had objected to the film after learning that it incorporated a clip she had made for a different movie, which had been partially dubbed and in which she appeared to be asking: “Is your Mohammed a child molester?”

Garcia’s attorney, Cris Armenta, opposed Google’s request to repost the video while the appeal proceeds. The actress received death threats as a result of her appearance in the film.

The controversial film, billed as a film trailer, depicted the Prophet Mohammed as a fool and a sexual deviant. It sparked a torrent of anti-American unrest among Muslims in Egypt, Libya and other countries in 2012.

Read the full story by Dan Levine here.

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