FaithWorld

Erdogan’s presidential rival, ex-OIC head, says keep religion out of politics

By Reuters Staff
June 27, 2014
(Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, leading opposition candidate for August's presidential elections, meets with Republican People's Party (CHP) Leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu (R) in Ankara June 26, 2014. Last week, the secularist Republican People's Party and the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) said they had agreed to nominate Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, who stepped down in December as head of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), as their joint candidate for the presidential race. REUTERS/Umit Bektas )

(Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, leading opposition candidate for August’s presidential elections, meets with Republican People’s Party (CHP) Leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu (R) in Ankara June 26, 2014.  REUTERS/Umit Bektas )

The main Turkish opposition candidate for president stressed the need to keep religion out of politics on Thursday and called for national unity, a clear challenge to the divisive but popular Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan who looks set to win.

Erdogan, a founder of the ruling AK Party which has roots in Islamist politics, is expected to announce his candidacy next week and polls suggest he will win outright on Aug. 10 when Turks directly elect their president for the first time.

The opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) and the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) last week named Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu as their candidate, hoping to unite opposition to Erdogan, who remains widely popular despite alienating sections of society with his conservative agenda and aggressive style.

“We seek not a polarized, confrontational Turkey but a peaceful Turkey,” Ihsanoglu, a 70-year-old diplomat and academic told reporters in Ankara in his first public statement since his candidature was announced.

“We want to stress that all who have lived here together for centuries and all the values which make us what we are … constitute our common cultural heritage.”

Ihsanoglu stepped down as head of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) in December and his nomination is seen as an attempt to eat into Erdogan’s conservative religious voter base. Ihsanoglu tried to reassure millions of secular Turks who accuse Erdogan of overseeing creeping Islamisation of the state.

“Religion and politics should be kept separate. One of the problematic issues for the Islamic world is that religion and politics are mixed up,” he said.

Read the full story by Gulsen Solaker here.

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