Nigeria’s megachurches: a hidden pillar of Africa’s top economy

October 15, 2014
(Bishop David Oyedepo (C), founder of the Living Faith Church, also known as the Winners' Chapel, conducts a service for worshippers in the auditorium of the church in Ota district, Ogun state, some 60 km (37 miles) outside Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos September 28, 2014. Hundreds of millions of dollars change hands each year in Nigeria's popular Pentecostal "megachurches", which are modelled on their counterparts in the United States. Some of these churches can hold more than 200,000 worshippers and, with their attendant business empires, they constitute a significant section of the economy, employing tens of thousands of people and raking in tourist dollars, as well as exporting Christianity globally. To match Insight NIGERIA-MEGACHURCHES/ Picture taken September 28, 2014. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye )

(Bishop David Oyedepo (C), founder of the Living Faith Church, also known as the Winners’ Chapel, conducts a service for worshippers in Ota district, Ogun state, some 60 km (37 miles) outside Lagos September 28, 2014. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye )

No Saudi ban over Ebola for Nigerians going on haj – Arab News

September 9, 2014
(Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba at the Grand mosque during the annual Haj pilgrimage, in the holy city of Mecca October 17, 2013. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the Haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa )

(Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba at the Grand mosque during the annual Haj pilgrimage, in the holy city of Mecca October 17, 2013. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa )

Killing and preaching, Nigerian Islamist militants carve out their “caliphate”

By Reuters Staff
September 9, 2014
(Girls recite Quranic verses at an Islamic school in Maiduguri, Nigeria, May 24, 2014. REUTERS/Joe Penney )

(Girls recite Quranic verses at an Islamic school in Maiduguri, Nigeria, May 24, 2014. REUTERS/Joe Penney)

Nigeria opens its long-awaited battle of ideas against Boko Haram

July 31, 2014
(A teacher at Maska Road Islamic School teaches Hadith excerpts in a classroom in Kaduna, July 16, 2014. In classrooms facing a sandy courtyard in the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna, Maska Road Islamic School teaches a creed that condemns the violent ideology of groups like Boko Haram. The school is steadfast in preaching tolerance to its pupils, and the government is about to adopt this message in a new strategy for containing Boko Haram, which has killed thousands in a five-year campaign for an Islamic state. Picture taken July 16, 2014. To match Insight NIGERIA-BOKO HARAM/ REUTERS/Joe Penney)

(A teacher at Maska Road Islamic School teaches Hadith excerpts in a classroom in Kaduna, July 16, 2014. REUTERS/Joe Penney)

Protests erupt over new Emir of Kano, Nigeria’s second-highest Islamic authority

By Reuters Staff
June 10, 2014
(Nigeria's central bank governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi attends an interview with Reuters at the World Islamic Economic Forum in London October 30, 2013. Nigeria's central bank now wants inflation in a range between 6-9 percent, its governor Sanusi told Reuters on Wednesday, lowering the regulator's previous target of simply keeping it under 10 percent. To match Interview NIGERIA-INFLATION/ REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth)

(Nigeria’s former central bank governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi at the World Islamic Economic Forum in London October 30, 2013. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth)

Nigeria’s ex-central bank governor takes throne as Muslim monarch

By Reuters Staff
June 9, 2014
(Nigeria's Central Bank Governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi attends the World Islamic Economic Forum in London October 30, 2013. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth )

(Nigeria’s Central Bank Governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi attends the World Islamic Economic Forum in London October 30, 2013. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth)

Saudi Arabia’s top cleric says Nigeria’s Boko Haram smears Islam

May 10, 2014
(Women holding signs take part in a protest demanding the release of abducted secondary school girls from the remote village of Chibok, in Lagos May 5, 2014. The Islamist militant group Boko Haram claimed responsibility on Monday for the abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls during a raid in the village of Chibok in northeast Nigeria last month, the French news agency AFP reported, citing a video it had obtained. Boko Haram on April 14 stormed an all-girl secondary school in Chibok, in Borno state, then packed the teenagers, who had been taking exams, onto trucks and disappeared into a remote area along the border with Cameroon. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)

(Women holding signs take part in a protest demanding the release of abducted secondary school girls from the remote village of Chibok, in Lagos May 5, 2014.REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)

Islamic officials condemn kidnapping of Nigerian schoolgirls

May 8, 2014
(A woman holds a sign during a protest demanding the release of abducted secondary school girls from the remote village of Chibok, in Lagos May 5, 2014. The Islamist militant group Boko Haram claimed responsibility on Monday for the abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls during a raid in the village of Chibok in northeast Nigeria last month, the French news agency AFP reported, citing a video it had obtained. Boko Haram on April 14 stormed an all-girl secondary school in Chibok, in Borno state, then packed the teenagers, who had been taking exams, onto trucks and disappeared into a remote area along the border with Cameroon. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)

(A woman holds a sign during a protest demanding the release of abducted secondary school girls from the remote village of Chibok, in Lagos May 5, 2014. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye)

Nigeria’s surging Christian-Muslim bloodshed strains ‘marriage of irreconcilables’

By Reuters Staff
April 29, 2014

(The leader of the displaced Fulani herdsmen Haruna Usman in Barkin Kogi, Zango Kataf, Kaduna State March 22, 2014. Picture taken March 22, 2014. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde)

Nigeria largely ignores sectarian violence, Human Rights Watch report says

By Reuters Staff
December 12, 2013

(Onitsha in southeastern Nigeria after religious riots that killed at least 138 people across the country in five days. February 23, 2006. REUTERS/George Esiri )