FaithWorld

Second dead Dutch Catholic bishop found guilty of sex abuse of minors

(Saint Catherine’s Cathedral, Utrecht, September 2004/Fruggo)

The Dutch Catholic Church, in the second such embarrassing admission this month, announced on Friday that a bishop who died in 2000 had been found guilty of sexually abusing boys decades ago.

Utrecht archdiocese, where Johannes Nienhaus was auxiliary bishop from 1982 to 1999, said a commission investigating the scandals that have shaken the Catholic Church in many countries in the past decade had confirmed four complaints against him.

Earlier this month, Roermond diocese said its late bishop Johannes Gijsen had sexually abused two boys, also decades ago.

The Utrecht announcement came two days before the late Pope John Paul II, whom critics accuse of failing to investigate the clerical sex abuse scandal as evidence of it piled up in the later years of his pontificate, is to be declared a saint.

The Amsterdam daily De Volkskrant, which uncovered the story, said the abuse took place from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s when Nienhaus was chaplain and later rector of a junior seminary in Apeldoorn.

from The Great Debate:

The uncanonized saints

The Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph in Brooklyn, nearing the end of a long restoration, has a new mural over its main doors. Surrounding the Holy Spirit, in the form of an incandescent dove, is a gathering of women and men flanked by angels. Most have soft yellow halos, but three figures, including the pair closest to the dove, do not.

The three are local icons. Activist and writer Dorothy Day wears a hat with the inscription “NO WAR” and holds a stack of Catholic Worker newspapers, the publication she founded. Beside her is Bernard Quinn, a priest who served Brooklyn’s African American community at a church just blocks away, and whose Long Island orphanage was twice burned down by racists. Pierre Toussaint, who looks intently toward the dove, was a slave-turned-philanthropist who, on gaining his freedom in 1807, adopted his surname from the leader of the Haitian revolution.

Sunday, as Popes John XXIII and John Paul II receive their halos through the Vatican’s canonization process, it may be especially hard to remember that not all saints have official halos. Nor does one have to be a world-famous pope to be a saint.

Souvenir boom as Poles set to fete their nation’s new saint John Paul II

(Sculptor Czeslaw Dzwigaj works on bas-relief of the late Pope John Paul II in his atelier near Krakow April 9, 2014. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel)

Souvenir shops at the Sanctuary of Divine Mercy in Krakow, where Karol Wojtyla was archbishop before becoming Pope John Paul II, do a brisk trade in papal memorabilia now that he is due to be declared a saint.

In one store in the southern Polish city, a saleswoman says she has sold several thousand candles with an image of the late pope on them, at prices from 12 zlotys ($3.95) on up.

Papal canonizations a lesson in subtle art of Catholic Church politics

(DATE IMPORTED:April 25, 2014Two priest walk as they hold pictures of Pope John Paul II (L) and Pope John XXIII in front of St. Peter’s square, in Rome April 25, 2014.REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini )

When the late Popes John XXIII and John Paul II are declared saints on Sunday, the Vatican ceremony will be both a spiritual event for Roman Catholicism and a lesson in the subtle politics of the world’s largest church.

Most of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics will generally agree that these two men, in their own ways, were holy and charismatic pastors who helped their 2,000-year-old Church to confront the challenges of the modern era.

Angry Muslims in Central African Republic call to partition the country

(Muslims fleeing sectarian violence are seen on top of a truck with their belongings, on the road between Bangui and Sibut, on a convoy being escorted by French peacekeepers to the south eastern town of Bambari April 20, 2014. Picture taken April 20, 2014. REUTERS/Emmanuel Braun )

In this dusty town at the heart of the Central African Republic, many angry Muslims advocate a simple solution to the threat of religious violence from Christian militias terrorising the country’s south: partition.

Bambari lies near the dividing line separating Central African Republic’s Christian south – where mobs have lynched hundreds of Muslims and torn down their homes – from a northern region controlled by the mostly Muslim Seleka rebels.

Israel rejects link of Ukraine crisis to anti-Semitism

(Jewish men attend morning prayer at a synagogue in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine April 20, 2014. REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Israel played down on Thursday suggestions that anti-Semitism in Ukraine is linked to Kiev’s standoff with Russia, offering a more measured assessment than the Kremlin or the United States as it avoids taking sides in the East-West confrontation.

Moscow has aimed allegations of anti-Semitism against the pro-Western Ukrainian government. Washington has condemned an incident in a city with a strong pro-Russian movement where Jews were handed leaflets using language reminiscent of the Holocaust.

Thousands mob India’s Modi as election race starts in Hinduism’s sacred city

(Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi, prime ministerial candidate for India’s main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), waves to his supporters as he arrives to file his nomination papers for the general elections in the northern Indian city of Varanasi April 24, 2014. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi )

India’s Narendra Modi received a hero’s welcome from thousands of orange-clad supporters as he launched his election campaign on Thursday in the religious city of Varanasi, a show of strength for the Hindu nationalist tipped to be prime minister.

India is halfway through the world’s largest-ever election, in which 815 million people are eligible to vote over 10 stages. Modi will stand for the parliamentary seat of the Ganges river city of Varanasi on May 12, four days before results are due.

Sri Lanka deports British tourist for her Buddha tattoo

(A worker paints a statue of Buddha during renovations at Gangaramaya temple in Colombo September 22, 2009. REUTERS/Andrew Caballero-Reynolds)

Sri Lanka on Thursday deported a British tourist for having a tattoo of Buddha on her arm which a court said was an insult to the island’s main religion.

Legally, there is no ban on a Buddha tattoo in Sri Lanka, but the predominantly Buddhist nation is very sensitive about its religion.

Jews hail new papal saints who revolutionized ties with Catholics

(Pope John Paul II, standing in front of a group of Italian rabbis, waves
farewell April 13, 1986, to members of Rome’s Jewish community in the Rome
Synagogue. REUTERS/Luciano Mellace)

The late Popes John XXIII and John Paul II, who will be made saints on Sunday, did so much to end two millennia of Catholic anti-Semitism that a Jewish human rights group calls them “heroes to the Jewish people”.

Both pontiffs marked the world’s largest church in such varied ways that most Roman Catholics would probably list their pioneering respect for Jews, whom John Paul called “our beloved elder brothers” in faith, behind their other achievements.

Justin Bieber apologizes after Japan shrine visit sparks Asian anger

(Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, 2010/Wiiii)

Canadian pop singer Justin Bieber, whose tumultuous life has landed him in trouble more than once, on Wednesday apologized for a visit to a Tokyo shrine at the center of a bitter international row over Japan’s wartime aggression.

Bieber, 20, posted a picture on social media of himself visiting Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine with the heading, “Thank you for your blessings”.

The picture was later deleted, although it was republished elsewhere on the Internet, including by a Bieber fan group, and drew criticism from South Korea and China.