FaithWorld

Struggle for rich resources at root of Central Africa’s religious violence

(A woman sits by her wounded relative in a clinic run by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) in Bangui December 23, 2013.  REUTERS/Andreea Campeanu)

Mariam watched in horror as militiamen burst through the gate of her home in Central African Republic’s capital Bangui and demanded her husband say whether he was Muslim. When he said yes, they shot him dead.

“They killed him just like that in front of our child,” said Mariam, who fled through the back door. “Then they hacked and clubbed our neighbours, a husband and wife, to death.”

The two-day frenzy of violence in Bangui this month – in which militia killed 1,000 people, according to Amnesty International – fed fears that Central African Republic was about to descend into religious warfare on a scale comparable to Rwanda’s 1994 genocide.

The slaughter – a response to months of atrocities by mostly Muslim fighters from the Seleka rebel group who seized power in March – prompted France to immediately deploy 1,600 troops under a U.N. mandate to protect civilians.

Atheists should work with believers for peace, Pope Francis says on Christmas

(Pope Francis holds the baby Jesus statue at the end of the Christmas night mass in the Saint Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican December 24, 2013. REUTERS/Tony Gentile)

Pope Francis, celebrating his first Christmas as Roman Catholic leader, on Wednesday called on atheists to unite with believers of all religions and work for “a homemade peace” that can spread across the world.

Speaking to about 70,000 people from the central balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica, the same spot where he emerged to the world as pope when he was elected on March 13, Francis also made another appeal for the environment to be saved from “human greed and rapacity”.

Another dark Christmas for Iraq Christians, bombs kill at least 34

(People stand among debris at the site of a bomb attack at a marketplace in Baghdad’s mostly Christian Doura District December 25, 2013. REUTERS/Ahmed Malik )

It’s Christmas in Baghdad, and once again Iraq’s Christians are celebrating behind blast walls and barbed wire.

At least 34 people died in bomb attacks in Christian areas on Wednesday, some by a car bomb near a church after a Christmas service. A church attack in 2010 killed dozens.

from The Great Debate:

Punitive politics: Blame the Puritans

‘Tis the season of giving, charity and good will -- unless you happen to be a Republican, and then ‘tis the season of pusillanimity, churlishness and bad will.

Congressional Republicans seem hell-bent on denying the most disadvantaged among us healthcare, unemployment benefits and, perhaps worst of all, food stamps, from which the House of Representatives slashed $40 billion last month. Elizabeth Drew, writing in Rolling Stone, calls it “The Republicans’ War on the Poor.”

You can attribute these benefit cuts to plain meanness with a dose of political calculation thrown in, as Drew does. But there may be another explanation than congenital cruelty: Republicans believe they are adhering to a principle that they place above every other value, including compassion. That principle is the need to punish individuals whom they view as undeserving.

from The Great Debate:

Pope Francis: Beyond the compelling gestures

The most talked about person in the world -- no surprise there! -- is Pope Francis. Polls and Internet traffic confirm: No celebrity even comes close to him in fame or favor.

When it comes to “followers,” the pope does have an enormous head start, as leader of the 1.2 billion-member Roman Catholic Church. He also inspires unmatched curiosity and attention globally among many millions from other faiths and no faiths.

Francis comments most effectively through compelling gestures. The public sees him kissing the bare foot of an imprisoned Muslim woman, or the illness-ravaged face of a man he is blessing. When a child jumps to his side or grabs his papal skull cap, the pope is attentive, undistracted. Less instantaneous, but still revealing, gestures find him riding public buses, driving his own old car, living in humble quarters or sneaking off in the night to minister to the homeless.

Turkish PM Erdogan and Muslim cleric Gulen tangle over corruption scandal

(A demonstrator holds a shoe box, as a reference to reported shoe boxes of cash found in the house of Halkbank CEO Suleyman Aslan, during a demonstration against Turkey’s ruling Ak Party (AKP) and Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara December 21, 2013. The sign at left reads: “Government has to resign.” REUTERS/Umit Bektas)

A war of words escalated on Monday between Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan and a cleric with powerful influence in the police and judiciary, worsening political turmoil unleashed by a corruption scandal.

Turkey has been increasingly polarised since the arrest on graft charges last week of the head of state-run lender Halkbank and the sons of two government ministers. Erdogan answered the arrests by sacking or reassigning the Istanbul police chief and some 70 other police officers.

Edgar Bronfman, longtime head of World Jewish Congress, dies at 84

(World Jewish Congress President Edgar Bronfman speaks in New York, October 23, 1996. REUTERS/Mike Segar)

Billionaire businessman and philanthropist Edgar Bronfman, the chairman of the Seagram Company and long-serving president of the World Jewish Congress, died at his New York home on Saturday aged 84.

Montreal-born Bronfman took control of the Seagram empire from his father, Samuel Bronfman who had founded the liquor company in 1924. He then expanded its operations, acquiring Tropicana and moving Seagram into the chemicals business by making it DuPont’s largest minority shareholder.

Philippine typhoon survivors struggle to salvage Christmas

(A typhoon survivor decorates a Christmas tree amidst the rubble of destroyed houses in Tacloban city in central Philippines December 17, 2013. REUTERS/Erik De Castro)

Filipino mother Rhodora Tonningsen has no tinsel or baubles for her Christmas tree this year so she’s decorated it with packets of instant noodles and empty sardine cans from relief supplies handed out to survivors of Typhoon Haiyan.

Across the centre of the mostly Catholic Philippines, people are scraping together whatever they can to celebrate Christmas, nearly seven weeks after the storm. Some are struggling to cope with their grief.

France to keep a headscarf ban despite negative legal advice

(French Education Minister Vincent Peillon speaks during a news conference in Paris December 3, 2013. REUTERS/Charles Platiau )

France decided on Monday to maintain a ban on Muslim headscarves for volunteer school monitors despite a warning that it overstepped the law requiring religious neutrality in the public service.

The Council of State, which advises the government on disputed administrative issues, said in a 32-page analysis that this neutrality did not apply to mothers who help escort schoolchildren on outings such as museum visits.

UK’s Marks and Spencer apologises after Muslim worker refused to sell alcohol

(A pedestrian carrying an M&S plastic bag walks past a Marks & Spencer shop in Brussels April 11, 2001. REUTERS/Thierry Roge)

Retailer Marks and Spencer apologised on Monday to customers angered after a Muslim checkout worker refused to sell champagne for religious reasons.

Thousands of customers threatened to boycott M&S, Britain’s biggest clothing retailer that also sells food, after a till worker in a London store asked a customer to wait as she would not handle champagne and called for another staff member.