(Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi addresses his BJP party’s supporters during a rally ahead of the state elections, in New Delhi November 30, 2013. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee)

Four men chatting in a Delhi bar are not, by their own admission, natural drinking buddies.

The young professionals in their 20s and 30s come from vastly different regions of India and varied backgrounds.

They first “met” on Twitter, spotting each other on the micro-blogging site where they voiced a common desire – to see Hindu nationalist leader Narendra Modi become the next prime minister.

After online introductions, they met face-to-face on their own initiative, and, finding they had plenty in common, gather monthly in the nation’s capital to talk about life, work, and, most importantly, how to make a difference in India’s upcoming election. The men insisted they paid for their own expenses, and only one of them was associated with Modi’s party.