from The Great Debate:

Islamic State owes Donald Trump a debt of gratitude

By Mohamad Bazzi
December 10, 2015

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump points to a supporter at a Pearl Harbor Day rally aboard the USS Yorktown Memorial in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, December 7, 2015. Trump on Monday called for a ban on Muslims entering the United States in the most dramatic response by a candidate yet to last week's shooting spree by two Muslims who the FBI said had been radicalized. "We have no choice," Trump said at a rally in South Carolina, warning of more Sept. 11-style attacks if stern measures are not taken. REUTERS/Randall Hill    TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX1XNF3

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump points to a supporter at a Pearl Harbor Day rally aboard the USS Yorktown Memorial in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, December 7, 2015. REUTERS/Randall Hill

from The Great Debate:

Carson in Jordan: God bless and keep the Syrians – far away from us

By Shibley Telhami
December 2, 2015

Source: Carson campaign/ Facebook/ screen shot

Source: Carson campaign/ Facebook/ screenshot

On Saturday Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson, who had strongly opposed absorbing Syrian refugees in the United States, suddenly turned up in Jordan visiting the very refugees he wants to keep away from American soil. What explains the sudden interest in a group GOP presidential candidates have been competing to keep out? Carson’s move, a new poll suggests, could well save his lead among evangelical Christians.

from The Great Debate:

The true motives behind Islamic State’s use of sexual slavery

By David Frankfurter
September 8, 2015

Members of the minority Yazidi sect hug each other on the outskirts of Kirkuk

Members of the Yazidi sect, among the 200 elderly and infirm released by Islamic State militants, on the outskirts of Kirkuk, April 8, 2015. REUTERS/Ako Rasheed

from The Great Debate:

Egypt’s grand mufti: No justification for terror in any religion

By Shawky Allam
April 1, 2015

A view of the Mosque of Mohammed Ali in the Citadel, the Sultan Hasan Mosque and the Al-Rifa'i Mosque in Cairo

The Mosque of Mohammed Ali in the Citadel (top), the Sultan Hasan Mosque and the Al-Rifa'i Mosque (bottom right) in Cairo, May 20, 2008, REUTERS/Nasser Nuri

from The Great Debate:

How Islamic State hijacked Islam’s history of tolerance

By Mohamad Bazzi
March 12, 2015

Assyrians hold banners as they march in solidarity with the Assyrians abducted by Islamic State fighters in Syria earlier this week, in Beirut

Assyrians hold banners as they march in solidarity with the Assyrians abducted by Islamic State fighters in Syria earlier this week, in Beirut, Feb. 28, 2015. Militants in northeast Syria are now estimated to have abducted at least 220 Assyrian Christians this week, a group monitoring the war reported. The banner (R) reads, "We are not afraid of whom kills the flesh, we are not afraid of who destroys the stone. Assyrians and victorious." REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

from Photographers' Blog:

From central banker to Islamic king

August 15, 2014

Kano, Nigeria

By Joe Penney

Last year Lamido Sanusi wore pin stripe suits and a colorful array of bow ties to work, and his job consisted mostly of managing interest rates and keeping inflation under control.

from Photographers' Blog:

Uighurs of Shanghai

July 22, 2014

Shanghai, China
By Aly Song

The traditional home of China’s Muslim Uighur community is the far western state of Xinjiang, a region that has been plagued by violence in recent years.

from Photographers' Blog:

The search for a mosque in Athens

June 27, 2013

Athens, Greece

By Yorgos Karahalis

Some say that to come in contact with “God” is a spiritual matter that has nothing to do with the particular spot or place where such contact takes place. Well, if it were that simple then there would be no need to build churches or mosques.

from Reihan Salam:

Boston and the future of Islam in America

By Reihan Salam
April 22, 2013

One of the central questions surrounding the Boston Marathon bombings is whether they portend a larger wave of terror attacks by homegrown Islamic radicals. The culprits, two brothers of Chechen origin, one of whom was a naturalized U.S. citizen, had both lived in the country for more than a decade. While the older brother is reported to have been sullen, resentful and ill at ease in his adopted country, the younger brother was by all accounts a well-mannered kid, whose main vice was marijuana. Many fear that if these two men could turn viciously against the country that gave them refuge, the same might be true of at least some small number of their co-religionists.

from India Insight:

Finding harmony in music and Islam

February 20, 2013

The grand mufti whose words against music ended the short career of an all-girl teenage pop band in Kashmir last month made me wonder: is music really un-Islamic? He said that if women indulge in indecent, immoral acts such as singing, it would be a step toward their destruction. Is it really that simple in Islam? Of course it isn't.