FaithWorld

from Tales from the Trail:

Door-knocking Romney reprises missionary days

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney could be excused for having flashbacks to the 1960s when he went door to door in Berlin, New Hampshire, on Thursday.

The former Massachusetts governor worked in France as a Mormon missionary from 1966 to 1968, one of the church's thousands of earnest young men (mostly) who knock on doors and proselytize. At that point Romney had plenty of doors slammed in his face, but on Thursday, not so much.

"This is a lot easier," Romney quipped to Reuters. "People speak English. They wish you Merry Christmas. They don't think you're a salesman. People used to come to the door [in France] and wag their fingers: 'No, I don't want anything.'"

Many French people at the time were "not happy to see Americans, because we were in Vietnam at the time. That was tough," he added.

Romney strode around the depressed paper milling town in northern New Hampshire, talking to residents in their front doorways, to dog-walkers, and to people in passing cars who slowed down at the curious sight of Romney, handlers and trailing horde of media. At one point he broke into a run, leaving even his bodyguards behind.

from Tales from the Trail:

Romney on his work as a Mormon missionary: “We didn’t convert one person”

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney appeared on MSNBC's Morning Joe on Tuesday, where co-host Joe Scarborough asked him about his experience as a Mormon missionary in France in the 1960s. "Talk about your rejections as a missionary knocking on door, after door, after door in a hostile environment," Scarborough asked.

Romney recalled five months he spent in one French city, where he said near-constant brush-offs built his resilience:

"We knocked on doors from morning until quite late in the evening," he said. "We didn't convert one person in five months. So, you understand the rejection, you know that's a pretty high level of rejection and you get used to it. You say, 'okay, what do I believe, what's important to me,' and you don't measure yourself and your success by how other people react, but instead by how you're doing and how you feel about the things you care about."

Huckabee wins round one in 2012 Republican race

Former Arkanas Governor and Republican presidential contender Mike Huckabee has won the first informal round in what will no doubt be a long race to head the party’s White House ticket in 2012.

The affable Baptist preacher, who won the hearts and minds of conservative evangelicals during his failed 2008 bid for the Republican presidential nomination, topped other possible Republican presidential contenders in a straw poll at a summit of Christian conservative voters in Washington.

PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL/

Out of a field of nine, Huckabee garnered the most votes or 28.5 percent. Delegates to the convention were asked: “Thinking ahead to the 2012 presidential election and assuming the nomination of Barack Obama as Democtats’ choice for president, who would you vote for as the Republicans nominee for president?”