(Nigeria's central bank governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi attends an interview with Reuters at the World Islamic Economic Forum in London October 30, 2013. Nigeria's central bank now wants inflation in a range between 6-9 percent, its governor Sanusi told Reuters on Wednesday, lowering the regulator's previous target of simply keeping it under 10 percent. To match Interview NIGERIA-INFLATION/ REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth)

(Nigeria’s former central bank governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi at the World Islamic Economic Forum in London October 30, 2013. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth)

Hundreds of youths protested on Monday against a decision to appoint Nigeria’s former central bank governor as the country’s second-highest Islamic authority.

Sunday’s state government decision to make Lamido Sanusi the Emir of Kano, one of the most influential positions in the largely Muslim north, surprised many who had expected the job to pass from father to son as a sign of stability when the north faces an Islamist insurgency.

Sanusi, an outspoken critic of the government’s record on corruption, became the Emir two days after the death of his great uncle, the last emir.

Protesters backing the late emir’s oldest son, Lamido Ado Bayero, chanted “Ba ma son”, or “We don’t want” in the Hausa language, and “Kariya ne”, meaning “It’s a lie”, near the emir’s palace in Kano, the north’s main city, witnesses told Reuters.