Salvation Army members sing and dance at Rockefeller Center during Black Friday Sales in New York November 29, 2013. Black Friday, the day following Thanksgiving Day holiday, has traditionally been the busiest shopping day in the United States. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

The Salvation Army has settled a lawsuit brought a decade ago by now-former employees who accused the U.S. charity of pressuring them to follow its religious mission while they worked on government-funded social service projects.

The organization’s greater New York division agreed to provide employees of its government-funded services including daycare centers and homeless shelters a document saying it will not ask about their religious beliefs or require them to profess adherence to its religious policies, said the New York Civil Liberties Union, which represented the plaintiffs.

The document will also state that employees are not required to participate in religious activities in the workplace, the NYCLU said in a statement. The charity agreed to pay $450,000 in damages and attorneys’ fees to two plaintiffs.

U.S. District Judge Sidney Stein, who in 2005 had dismissed some claims against the Salvation Army, approved the settlement in Manhattan federal court on Tuesday.