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Election day, caught on the Web

November 3, 2008

(Reporting and writing by Alex Dobuzinskis)

When it comes to election day news, TV coverage is so 2004. The Internet will cover election day from every angle on Tuesday — from the left and right sides of the political spectrum and with plenty of opportunity for Web users to get involved.
    
CNN will allow users to make their own predictions about which candidate will capture the votes in each state at CNN.com/Map, and to compare scenarios for how Republican John McCain or Democrat Barack Obama can get to the 270 Electoral College votes needed to win the presidency. CNN is also giving Web users the latest information on voting problems at CNN.com/VoterHotline.
    
The cable channel Current is relying on the Internet to provide material for its broadcast, and it will air 12-second webcam commentaries on the election submitted to 12seconds.tv and Current.com.
    
From the liberal perspective, the Huffington Post will cover election day with live video feeds and with blogs from American and international writers. Also, thousands of the site’s “citizen journalists” will follow the election paying special attention to what occurs at polling places, said Mario Ruiz, a spokesman for the site.
    
The Web site TownHall.com will look at the election from a conservative viewpoint, which it has done on the Internet since 1995. In addition to having video and plenty of opportunity for Web users to comment on the day’s developments, it will also have audio from election day broadcasts by such conservative talk show hosts as Dennis Prager and Michael Medved.

Comments

just wondering if anyone else noticed another flip by obama in an intreview on espn monday night football obama was wearing a flag lapel pin what will he do next to win votes also how do you not know your aunt is nor an illegal alien i applied for a job with the goverment and they found i didnt pay a bill on time so ether its harder ot get a civil service or he just didnt think it wasnt important

Posted by sean p mcginnis | Report as abusive
 

“how do you not know your aunt is nor an illegal … ether its harder ot get a civil service or he just didnt think it wasnt important”

Considering it’s about as relevant as what color socks his grandfather wore in 1943, he probably didn’t think it was important (what an elitist, huh!). McCain literally has no issues he wants to run on, which is why 100% of his ads are attack ads. While accusing your opponent of being a Marxist-Muslim (!) or being a terrorist-lover, used to work for the GOP, at time when the economy’s in the toilet and we’re throwing away a billion dollars a week on a war that weakens US national security (not to mention Osama Bin Laden’s “enduring freedom”), those fantasy-land smears carry no weight with sentient beings. The morally bankrupt conservative ideology is about to be justifiably mutilated by the left. It should be fun :-)

Posted by Luther Brixton | Report as abusive
 

Just found this out. Deerfield Beach, Fla. is one hour south of Palm Beach.
Nearly 400 people were firmly planted in line at 6:15 this morning, waiting for the polls to open at 7:00 AM.
There is ONE voting machine to accommodate all of them.
The area almost entirely African American. Many of the people have never voted before.
One woman was 101 years old. She was wheeled into the polling place and on her way out she said that before she died, she wanted to vote for a black man.
Election monitors noticed a man in line who appeared to be a voter. Turns out he was a saboteur, telling people the Democrats were supposed to vote at a different location.
Some of the voters said they were robocalled last night. The message — Democrats weren’t supposed to vote until Wednesday.

Posted by Cindy | Report as abusive
 

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