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Don’t call me an airbrush, fumes Kate Winslet

November 5, 2008

Kate Winslet is not happy. A day after telling “Vanity Fair” magazine that she still feels like the “fat kid,” the British actress has attacked suggestions in the British press that her body was airbrushed to improve her physique for a glamorous front cover shot for the magazine. Her rep told People magazine that “Kate is furious at suggestions that her body has been airbrushed.” She said the only tweaks were the usual adjustments in glamour shots for skin shades.

“She is in terrific shape and what you see is how she looks or she would never have agreed to pose for those shots,” her rep told People magazine.

Why such a fuss? The 33-year-old actress and mother-of-two has been outspoken about her refusal to lose weight to conform the Hollywood ideal and ignored the British media following her weight fluctuations over the years. In early 2003 Britain’s GQ magazine had to apologise after running some digitally slimmed down pictures of Winslet to which she had not given her consent. At the time Winselt said she did not want people to think she was a hypocrite.

Comments

Does this story even matter at all? With all that’s going on in the world, do people really care whether or not some celebrity is being air-brushed? I know I don’t.

Posted by Gregg | Report as abusive
 

Ever since James Cameron is reported to have called her “Kate Weighs-alot,” I just have to scratch my head. Kate is most definitely fleshier than a supermodel, but she’s still well below the weight of the average British or American female. Who is it that’s so threatened by her beauty and her talent that they have to keep perpetuating this nonsense? A quick perusal of Google images of her do show a fluctuation from bony back to normal — is anyone surprised, given all the guff she gets?

Posted by Janet V | Report as abusive
 

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