Fan Fare

Entertainment behind the scenes

Harrison Ford’s gun doesn’t come cheap!

May 6, 2009

ford1Remember the blaster gun from “Blade Runner”  we told you about in April that was being auctioned off. It was the one Harrison Ford used to kill futuristic humanoids in the 1982 science fiction film. Well, we learned today that it was sold this past weekend — for $270,000.

That’s right, in these so-called tough economic times, amid a recession, a buyer forked out more than one quarter of a million dollars to own Harrison Ford’s gun — or old gun. And it’s just a movie gun, a prop! Harrison Ford’s prop. We hope that whoever bought it really enjoys it, and we think — as we look at our own dismal 401k statements whose values dwindle every month — maybe it was a good buy.

Los Angeles-based auctioneer Profiles in History said its recent spring auction of Hollywood memorabilia sold $4.2 million worth of stuff once used for movies. An original 1931 ”Frankenstein” promotional poster sold for $216,000, and an archive of photographs from of MGM, Fox and Warner Bros. fetched $210,000.

Elsewhere, the original Creature of the Black Lagoon “Gill Man” mask from “Revenge of the Creature” was sold for $84,000, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Mr. Freeze” costume from “Batman & Robin” brought $72,000, and one of Harrison Ford’s costumes from blade-runner-blaster-1“Blade Runner” got $48,000 under the hammer — obviously because you can’t shoot it, which brings us back to the gun.

It’s a movie prop! In this economy, people can buy houses for a quarter of a million dollars — even in California. So, why pay $$$$$$ for Harrison Ford’s gun?

Comments

Harrison Ford is the man!

 

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