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Entertainment behind the scenes

Another side of Bob Dylan: Kinky domestic violence

By Dean Goodman
May 13, 2009

Bob Dylan is entering the torture-porn comedy arena with a new video from his chart-topping album.
    
The on-screen action in “Beyond Here Lies Nothin’” follows a bloody battle between an attractive young woman and her older male captor in a seedy motel room. After stabbing him she escapes, runs him over with a car, and then smacks him — with a passionate kiss.
    
bobdDylan doesn’t actually appear in the video, having perhaps learned from “Tight Connection to My Heart” and a handful of features that acting is not his strong suit.
    
His Columbia Records label does not know if he has even seen it. The company has carte blanche with his videos, and its main job is “to push the envelope, to try not to be predictable,” said Greg Linn, Columbia’s vice president of marketing. 
    
The video premiered Tuesday on the cable channel IFC and its Web site. The company “jumped at the chance” to get an exclusive two-day window, said Craig Parks, IFC’s vice-president of digital media. IFC said the video was the right fit for its audience, which skews towards young male hipsters. But it garnered a hostile reception from fans, judging by comments posted on the Dylan fan Web site Expecting Rain.
    
The low-budget video was filmed in one day last month at the Astro Motel in downtown Los Angeles, with Australian filmmaker Nash Edgerton directing actors Amanda Aardsma and Joel Stoffer.
    
The actors did most of their own stunts, said Aardsma, who likened her feisty role to the one played by Rose McGowan, in Robert Rodriguez’ zombie thriller “Planet Terror. ” “The next day, I was pretty bruised and battered,” she said.
    
The video explores the thin line between love and hate. “It leaves you wondering whether they’re in a relationship or she’s suffering from Stockholm Syndrome,” Aardsma added.
    
Linn said “Beyond Here Lies Nothin’” was chosen over other cuts from “Together Through Life,” because it’s a thought-provoking tune that “sums up the whole record.” Romantic musings are prevalent on the album, but there’s also a dark side, and label executives started “vamping” from there in sketching out the video’s concept, he said.
    
The song could be seen as slightly creepy. “Oh well I love you pretty baby, You’re the only love I’ve ever known,” Dylan sings. “Just as long as you stay with me, The whole world is my throne.” Or it could just be a simple love song.

The album, meanwhile, fell four places to No. 5 on the U.S. pop album chart on Wednesday. In the U.K., it has just begun a second week at the top.

Comments

You are completelt wrong: Dylan has a ton of charisma and presence as an actor and many of his clips and stage performance are classics. And I love his turn in Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

And that’s a great song by the way.

Posted by Proman | Report as abusive
 

the video is a piece of violent misogynous crap and I will not be surprised if sales plummet because of it

Posted by sammy | Report as abusive
 

NO, Dylan is a horrible actor! come on! and the video is so much better than the song… gosh, he should retire!

Posted by Prowoman | Report as abusive
 

Dylan acting in Things have changed is great
But he’s usually a terrible actor

Posted by me | Report as abusive
 

In my opinion the video is just CRAP, and Dylan should leave his record company just for allowing this rubbish. It is nasty, stupid, cheap, no related to the song… I think the dude made it for Marilyn Manson and he has it kept in a closet until something stupid enought wanted to buy it. Sad… Dylan has a son in the industry of video, could not give him a little of advice about this things?

I hope this is not just a marketing strategy… It would be so disgusting. I think this kind of explicit violence is more pornographic than sex scenes, and this is the kind of cheap scandalous video made just for been banned in tvs, so people talk about it. Sad, again, if the marketing department of Dylan’s label thinks they need a video like this to made the song more relevant, anyway…

Posted by Spanish Harlem | Report as abusive
 

How is it misogynous, she gets the better of him.

Next you’ll be complaining about Dylan going electric or doing the Jesus thing. We’re sorry Bob’s not as PC as you’d like.

Posted by Hipster | Report as abusive
 

I love Bob Dylan, but when I think of his acting perfomances, the word that comes to mind is wooden

Posted by woofer | Report as abusive
 

Nobody really knows who BobDlyan is. He’s not there to find.
He’s everybody and nobody. The entertainment field is strictly for marketing purposes, in some cases, but not all cases. I don’t know whether Bob sanctioned the violence in this film. It’s hard to figure that he doesn’t have much say in what gets promoted which has his name to it. I certainly would say that it’s most sad, if he doesn’t have a say in it.

as I get a very bad feeling that promoters think his music cannot stand on it’s own two legs but would have to have somebody promoting violent trash in order to draw attention to the music itself.
Is humanity so bored they have to revert to roman torture shows instead of focusing on what feeds the human soul in a constructive way?
Dylan’s music doesn’t need this video, it does stand on it’s own, but you have to think on his lyrics and choose whether you will see good or bad in it.
Dylan would say there is a dark side to life, so maybe he doesn’t care what his promoters promote, but if we, his audience do associate this violence with the man himself, it’s not going to help him in the long run, nor his sales.
and won’t do much for his love life either.
God bless him, I’m one who got a lot of inspiration from his tunes in a good way.

Posted by Alison | Report as abusive
 

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