Fan Fare

Entertainment behind the scenes

Vampires + romance = box office love

November 22, 2009

twilight-fans(Reporting and video by Marc Price)

Since when did girls start liking guys that stay up all hours at night — drinking? Blood, no less. Since when? Since always. And if a vamp knows how to bite more than her neck, all the better.

Vampire flicks have come a long way since Bella Lugosi, and while we’re a little young to have seen Lugosi in theaters, we do remember Jim Carrey and Lauren Hutton in “Once Bitten” (Today, that would be titled “Cougar Vampire”). We remember “An American Werewolf in London” and “Teen Wolf” — we’re allowed to mention werewolves given “New Moon” and its pack. And we can say, the beasts are doing far better today romancing the gals.

On the the subject of vamps, we note Johnny Depp was named People magazine’s sexiest man of the year (you can read about that here) last week. Johnny Depp? Everybody knows Robert Pattinson is the sexiest man — or is it Taylor Lautner? C’mon you “Twi-hards” (that’s a few of you pictured at the premiere at left), which is it: vampire Edward Cullen or werewolf Jacob Black? Pattinson or Lautner?

The movie smashed weekend box office records with a domestic haul of nearly $141 million (read that here), and we were out there again. We asked women: would they let Robert Pattinson drink their blood? The answer is below.

Comments

New Moon: A Review SummaryA young girl with no visible career aspirations or marketable skills falls head over heels for a glowing vampire.Rather then the evil blood sucking parasites we know them to be, Edward is simply a typical moping emo. His sole existence seems to revolve around portraying his suffering in the manner so endearing to 15-something jailbaits and 35-something cougars.In this case the tactic pays dividends by hooking the heart of Blandy McNobody. She immediately forms a complete emotional dependency on Edward, allowing him to consume every part of her waking existance in the manner reserved for all unhealthy and possibly abusive relationships.No effort is made to explore Blandy as a person because it simply is not relevant to the story. She is simply the emotional anchor who sits around while everything happens to her. Something that, presumably this film believes, all women should aspire to.In “New Moon” the relationship is abruptly ended. Thus allowing Blandy to expand her abusive relationship by realising she can’t live without her emotional crutch and forces her to seek another. She copes by turning to borderline suicidal actions just to raise the barest of emotions in her immature heart.A third wheel is added by the introduction of a spunky werewolf. And of course, Edward comes back as all ‘on-again-off-again’ boyfriends often do.Blandy is now given the perfect situation where she can now swoon around like an object, wondering which spunky male will spend enough time turning away from actual happening events to sweep her off her feet and give her the abusive relationship she craves.This movie is a perfect example of providing good role models for young women. Assuming that you live in the sixties and shout “Yabba-dabba-doo”.For all us others, it is a perfect example of how far we have come from the time when women dragged themselves out of the kitchen and realised that male-imposed media stereotype bulls*it only works when you let it.And for little girls who watch the movie and think it is how this generation should act? Perhaps it is a perfect example that perhaps there has been no damn progress at all.

Posted by Haha | Report as abusive
 

Oh i forgot,..yes rob patison is young and popular,but UGLY ,that dosent means nothing

Posted by rachel | Report as abusive
 

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