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Entertainment behind the scenes

Charlie Sheen and Lindsay Lohan. Double standards?

June 4, 2010

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Two Hollywood stars.  Two different stories.

1) Former child star turns wild child, convicted of drunken driving, goes into rehab a few times, parties ’round the clock, gets dumped from at least one movie, plans role as porn queen — and becomes laughing stock of the celebrity media.

2) Middle-aged actor, three times married, plays raunchy womanizer, couple of stints in rehab, former client of notorious Hollywood Madam,  pulls knife on wife during drunken Christmas Day argument  –  and acharlie sheenlmost doubles salary to become highest-paid actor on TV.

Lindsay Lohan and Charlie Sheen have both found themselves in a whole lot of  trouble this year.  But  while Lindsay’s star has long since fallen, Charlie has emerged virtually unscathed in the eyes of the public, the media and the industry.

Sheen is expected to be sentenced to 30 days in jail on Monday as a result of his violent and drunken Christmas Day fight in Aspen with third wife Brooke Mueller.  But his latest violence-related dust-up with the law has had no effect on audiences for his TV show “Two and a Half Men”, which remains the top-rated comedy on U.S. television.

After negotiating a new contract in May that reportedly almost doubled his pay to about $1.8 million — per episode — for the next two years,  Sheen is now, by far, the highest-paid actor in Hollywood.

Lindsay’s crimes, on the other hand, have brought nothing but bad news (and bad hair) for the once promising star of “Mean Girls” and “The Parent Trap.”  She’s barely worked for two years, her next project is playing “Deep Throat” porn queen Linda Lovelace in a low-budget movie,  and she risks being sent to jail later this year for violating her 2007 probation for reckless and drunken driving.

Lindsay is 23, and clearly has a lot of growing up to do.  Charlie is 44.

Double standards somewhere? We’re just asking.

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