Fan Fare

Entertainment behind the scenes

Critics curse Cage and “Season of the Witch”

January 7, 2011

CageNicolas Cage has a reputation for dividing the critics. Some love him, others loathe him, and many love and loathe him in the same breath. No such confusion over his latest movie, however, with “Season of the Witch“, out Friday, winning almost universal scorn among critics.

The Oscar-winning actor plays a war-weary, disillusioned 14th century crusader charged with transporting a young girl to a remote monastery on the orders of the church, which believes she is a witch responsible for a devastating plague sweeping Europe. Cage is not so sure, and promises her a fair hearing when they get to their destination. Accompanied by his comrade-in-arms, played by Ron Perlman, Cage’s character Behmen faces collapsing bridges and fierce, diabolical wolves on his way through the forest, only to come up against even greater forces of evil at the abbey.

Reviewers have not been kind to Cage, with the Rotten Tomatoes critic aggregator site giving it a putrid three percent approval rating based on one positive review out of 36. And all on the actor’s 47th birthday as well.

The Wall Street Journal, perhaps harshly, compares it with the Ingmar Bergman classic “The Seventh Seal”, in which a knight plays chess with Death. “Mr. Cage’s knight ends up playing second banana to a digital devil. Welcome to the January dead zone,” its review concludes. The Daily Telegraph had this to say: ”The stench of plague is all around, unless that’s an aroma emanating from the script.”

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