Comments on: When online publications erase writers’ careers http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Dan Akst http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1504 Sat, 09 May 2009 19:07:35 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1504 Regarding some safeguard against the kind of thing described here, there is a precedent of sorts in book publishing contracts, which commonly contain a reversion-of-rights clause if a book should fall out of print for a certain period–perhaps a year. A similar clause could restore rights to an online writer.

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By: Mick Weinstein http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1502 Sat, 09 May 2009 18:05:49 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1502 Yet another reason to work with us at Seeking Alpha – file backup!

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By: Matt http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1499 Sat, 09 May 2009 15:48:41 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1499 It doesn’t fix the broken links, but where content itself is MIA there is the Internet Archive and its ‘Wayback Machine’. iht.com and portfolio.com will be preserved there forever. Really, it’s a stupendous resource.

For example try http://web.archive.org/web/2008021008392 5/www.portfolio.com/views/blogs/market-m overs/2008/02/08/exxon-mobil-plays-hardb all-with-venezuela

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By: Thomas Crampton http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1497 Sat, 09 May 2009 14:02:43 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1497 @cna

Yes, the work is still available on Lexis-Nexis, but that is only were a few people can access it.

The real value of the Internet and social media is the interlinking of information and ideas.

Anyone following up on IHT links posted on blogs or discussion boards is now sent to a generic page.

This means the NY Times will be losing revenue and frustrating readers. Hardly something you want to do at a time when revenues are dropping so fast!

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By: sandy http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1490 Sat, 09 May 2009 11:43:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1490 Agree Felix, one need to be cautious on these things, The contract need to be reviewed again for avoiding such things in future for the benefit of everybody…

Cheers,
Sandy

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By: Geoff http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1489 Sat, 09 May 2009 09:41:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1489 Embedding the byline within the article is a way to circumvent evil webmasters from deleting your work, never to be seen again.

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By: rkillings http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1487 Sat, 09 May 2009 05:19:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1487 Why not just duplicate your byline in *the text of the post*?

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By: cna http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/comment-page-1/#comment-1485 Sat, 09 May 2009 03:49:15 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/05/09/when-online-publications-erase-writers-careers/#comment-1485 Surely Crampton’s work is still documented by Lexis-Nexis, correct? It doesn’t do a lot of good for those without a subscription to Lexis-Nexis, but it’s still documented.

Prior to the advent of the internet, was is common for publishers to archive all printed material themselves or did they leave that job to libraries and indexing services?

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