Wednesday links get tweeted

By Felix Salmon
May 27, 2009

Since moving onto Twitter, I’ve pretty much stopped the daily linkfest, moving the quick hits onto there. But there’s no reason they shouldn’t continue to exist in blog format too. So here are some of my most recent tweets. Is there an easy way to automate this kind of thing?

# Pequot Capital closing. End of an era, but there won’t be too many tears.    

# My new strapline, explained by Andrew Leonard

# Sotomayor’s a foodie! My mouth is watering, I could do with some lengua y orejas de cuchifrito right now

# The Manichean history of teabags and douches

# Moody’s said that the USA’s Aaa rating is stable “even with a significant deterioration in the US govt’s debt position.”

# I wouldn’t pay $2 at the newsstand for a print version of the daily NYT. Who would?

# Martin Feldstein knows from recessions. And he reckons this one won’t be over until 2010

# Mark Thoma has your daily Sachs vs Easterly-and-Moyo links. All very predictable and boring.

# Warren Buffett’s long-time excuse for not paying a dividend doesn’t work any more. But he’s still not paying a dividend.

# The comptroller of the currency is “totally unsuccessful”. Time for the entire OCC to go.

# Obama’s White House is just as addicted to needless secrecy as any other administration

# Silicon Valley discovers the recession

# It has been Far Too Quiet of late… “maybe we are on the verge of a financial Krakatoa

# Interesting S&P500/gas price chart — but what’s the significance of the 403 level?

# I like this, on student debts; I wonder how is it related to this

# David Brooks Fail: Brad DeLong brings Godwin’s Law down on the hapless columnist

# Top 10 Electronic Police States

Comments
11 comments so far

Please keep posting these. I can’t figure out what the hell Twitter is yet.

Sure, there are ways to automate this kind of thing. Twitter offers lots of web services (though I’ve never actually delved much into them, I haven’t delved into Twitter yet).

After a cursory look, here’s an example of what is available to embed Twitter updates in a blog:
http://tweetpaste.thingamaweb.com/

Also, here was a page that I found that listed a bunch of other Twitter web services:
http://smartech.blogetery.com/2008/05/16  /69-twitter-web-services-you-should-kno w/

Posted by Kevin | Report as abusive

I don’t like not knowing the destination of the link.

Posted by NE1 | Report as abusive

$2 for the NYT — but it’s worse. The WSJ is -already- $2.50 as I learned to my chagrin in the airport last week.

Posted by Observer | Report as abusive

Ditto about the links. URL shorteners are bad news.

Posted by Trieu | Report as abusive

I agree that the bit.ly links are really annoying–I’m much more likely to click on a link if I can mouse-over to see the source.

Posted by Nick | Report as abusive

on ur story about the countdown for the pre’s widget…. i just wanna give u a lil bit of info. there is no problem with the widget. when u get into a page with that ad, the widget uses the system time on your computer. so the ads are all going to show different count time. also, i noticed that the widgets only work for a few minutes, then most often stop working…. i think it does resemble the NOW because it works perfectly fine when u load the page the ad is in… thank you!

Posted by Marco | Report as abusive

Here y’all go http://i2pi.com/rez/felix/

I also don’t like not seeing the destination before clicking on a link. If you have to use URL shorteners, then maybe put the source between brackets next to it.

Posted by dimitri d | Report as abusive

Please keep posting these, Felix. I refuse to enter the twitter era!

Posted by Unsympathetic | Report as abusive

Thanks Josh.

Posted by zach | Report as abusive
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