Opinion

Felix Salmon

Friday links have a few surprises

By Felix Salmon
June 12, 2009

Nafta infoporn

Pie charts: Pretty boring things. But add some white dots and some black dots, and they become videogametastic!   

Foreign holdings of US debt are staying high

Finally: “We should stop using the metaphor about the war on drugs,” says the drugs czar. Next up: the “czar” metaphor

Current TV censors its own employees

The NYT Article Skimmer is better than ever, make sure to play around with the Settings. I love it!

GM CDS auction looks to settle around 11 cents on the dollar

Citi’s bond traders’ salaries should be capped at whatever traders at Freddie Mac are making, it’s all you need to pay

A cute counterintuitive empirical analysis of the effect of new tennis balls

Is Murdoch selling the Weekly Standard to ensure that Wendi doesn’t get the opportunity to kill it when he dies?

Basic anatomy baffles Britons. Would USAians do any better?

The official Ecuador success rate on its bond exchange was 91%. Lower than I expected, but still a win.   

“The Bloodcopy blog has attracted more than 11m page views” — Can this possibly be true?

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Compete isn’t a great source for website stats, but they’re usually within an order of magnitude. They report 50,000 unique visitors to bloodcopy.com in May:
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/bloodco py.com+gawker.com/

So my vote is no!

 

I’m just about finished with the second draft of my vampire novel. Is all this publicity about vampires going to help me sell my book or hurt me? It’s hellish being a novelist, but I’ve yet to find a way to make money posting comments on blogs. In fact, I’ve yet to find a way to get positive feedback about my posting on blogs. Of course, I’ve yet to find a way to make money writing novels. I’ve written an enormous amount of text for no fee, and seem unable to stop.

Good work on that anatomy headline. I had to read the story to see if Brits couldn’t tell their heads from their…Well, I think you’re correct. We in the US wouldn’t do much better on that test.

Is it just me, or did other readers laugh uncontrollably at those drawings with the choices? Of course, I’ve had ten kidney stones. I wonder how the ovaries percentage broke down between the sexes? It’s hard to believe that more men know where their ovaries are than their lungs. Or did I read that graph wrong?

How could people not find their heart and lungs and stomach? That defies belief. Couldn’t they jog in place, hear and feel their heart and lungs. Then eat a candy bar, and try to determine where it’s heading?

 

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