Monday links get lost

By Felix Salmon
July 14, 2009

In a survey of 12,500 people in 13 countries, almost half of respondents admitted to giving wrong directions on purpose

Ezra Klein says that “of course” the Cheesecake Factory is delicious — but does that go for, say, Applebee’s, too? And isn’t the food at all these places generally too sweet?

“In a 2004 interview—well before the launch of Portfolio–Conde Nast CEO Charles O. “Chuck” Townsend said that the one magazine he’d like his company to own would be BusinessWeek. (Scroll way down here.) But, given the company’s experience with Portfolio, it’s not clear if that sentiment persists.”

I hate the CIA World Factbook redesign

Share music via Bluetooth? In reading that, I immediately felt old. Not only have I never done this myself, I didn’t even know people did this. Were you aware?”

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Comments
4 comments so far

sharing stuff via bluetooth (not just music, also funny videos or photos, contacts, whatever) is really practical, because so many phones support it. Just out of luck if you have an iphone (why, apple, why????) I did this all the time with my old phone, but just last weekend, someone wanted to share a photo with me, and ofc had to say it doesn’t work with the iphone. Now I have to wait till maybe the get it on a pc and then send it :(

Posted by flo | Report as abusive

On a very cursory review, the CIA world fact book’s redesign is quite impressive.

@Dave – yeah, it looks pretty, but as a frequent user of the factbook, like i bet felix is, i have to agree with him. the old design might have looked kind of crummy but (a) it loaded really quickly, (b) words were immediately search-able and not hidden underneath category tabs, and (c) it feels like it’s got less information for some reason. i clicked on a few tabs for aruba, and it seemed pretty empty. probably because so much is under just one or two tabs (people and economy).

Why in the world, websites (or folks behind them) decide to use gray letters instead of black letters on a white background, in the name of brand identity? It strains the eye and makes reading those web pages a tedious chore. I am referring to the CIA World Factbook and many others like that. This trend is not old, but a recent (as in the last 3-4 years) phenomemon.

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