Opinion

Felix Salmon

Tuesday links work for peanuts

By Felix Salmon
July 14, 2009

Someone is hiring writers and paying $10 for 600 words

Eliot Spitzer on Matt Taibbi’s Goldman Sachs piece: “good journalism, and good reading”

“Asset allocation will work most of the time in the future but not always” — that’s just saying it’s certain to fail.

This can only be good

Nice gapminderish source for OECD macroeconomic data

I’ve made the Power Grid! But they massively undercount the number of unique visitors that Reuters gets.

Comments
3 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

“If you pay someone then you should like his answers to questions about this. Keep in mind no one can be correct every time but I think someone willing to make the effort to protect your assets and who can explain it easily to you is probably a keeper.”

I agree with this. You should follow the plan that you can understand.

“but not always” — that’s just saying it’s certain to fail.”

Are you saying that someone or some theory can be correct all of the time where investing is concerned? If it isn’t, chuck it?

 

$10 for 600 words? There are people out there offering (and getting pieces delivered ofr) a lot less than that. $1 for 300 I’ve seen…..

 

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with writing for glory rather than money. I’ve contributed probably a few thousand words to Wikipedia for zero dollars, and my Dad used to do software reviews for an old PC magazine for something like twenty bucks and a copy of the software. If they’d phrased the advert a bit differently, perhaps it wouldn’t look so crass. Then again…I’m guessing they don’t credit contributors, and their aim is to make money. So, yeah, screw ‘em.

Posted by Craig | Report as abusive
 

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