Opinion

Felix Salmon

Thursday links are eclipsed

By Felix Salmon
July 23, 2009

Do 30 percent of seriously delinquent borrowers “self-cure” without receiving a modification?

Justin Fox defends Taibbi — and even Gasparino

Downgrade Berkshire at your peril

Measuring vehicle miles travelled: I’d like to see insurers kick-start this one, charging per mile.

“Innovation as regulatory evasion is something regulators should expect. What we had instead was precisely the reverse.

More than you could ever want on why “the affordable mortgage depression” won’t end until 2013

Eclipsed

The new Wessell book sounds like a good read

Kindle is much better for fiction than nonfiction

Facebook, the Hollywood version

Beware for-profit loan modifiers

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

“Do 30 percent of seriously delinquent borrowers “self-cure” without receiving a modification?”

Put it another way and it seems more plausible. 70% of seriously delinquent borrowers default or need a modification. The single most common cause of delinquency is unemployment. So it stands to reason that a significant proportion of people will become seriously delinquent when they lose their job, and then become current again when they find a new one. The current house price situation muddies the water a fair bit, because the incentives to walk away are much higher, but not every state lets you do it, and there are obviously costs in doing so.

Posted by Ginger Yellow | Report as abusive
 

insurance on a per mile basis would be great for me, so someone tee it up, please. Road use charges on a per mile basis seems silly to me — gasoline taxes approximate the same effect, with an added tax on fuel inefficient vehicles. That seems like a sensible set up already in place.

Posted by bdbd | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
  •