Comments on: The value of a college education http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: lorri http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-9052 Sun, 22 Nov 2009 20:17:37 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-9052 I believe in higher education, however, the way things exist at this moment, it’s higher education just for the sake of it. It is not necessarily the contributing factor in most people’s sucess or failure, but rather a false measuring stick, used to include or exclude certain people from the job pool… It would make sense if there were some better guidlines formed by an association of hiring managers to help people hire employees on qualifications versus degree.
Lorrie

]]>
By: cindy http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-8317 Tue, 03 Nov 2009 19:01:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-8317 I have no doubt that many of the men and women who attend HArvard earn more than their counterparts. You have to be part of a pretty select group to get into Harvard, so either drive, amibtion, or family connections have put those students in a pretty select group to begin with. Hence, the characteristics that are probably going to help make them more sucessful over all in life.
I also think, like some others who have posted here, that employers who take the safe route, of eliminating any one without a college degree, are just plain lazy. Rather then get to know your applicants, or use your gut when you might feel someone is a good fit for your company, just check and see if they have a degree…So many people in California are graduating with degress from great universities, and they are doint the jobs that high school graduates did two years ago…so both parties are out of luck now…It would be nice if more employers would care about who can do a good job for them, rather then what kind of piece of paper is hanging on their walls…

]]>
By: Noumenon http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6686 Fri, 11 Sep 2009 12:59:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6686 Felix, that $121,000 number you cited is described in the paper like this:

The estimates of benefits of attaining a college degree are significantly understated. The
premium for earning the bachelor’s degree has been growing over time but our calculations
hold it static. College graduates also experience lower rates of unemployment, are healthier
and are more likely to receive employer-paid benefits. In addition, only those who earn college degrees are able to earn master’s, doctoral and professional degrees, the returns to which are
significantly greater than those of the bachelor’s degree.

]]>
By: drewbie http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6547 Wed, 09 Sep 2009 15:52:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6547 For some perspective, I went to a private university (class of ’08), and my ~$16,000 loan payment is $220/month.

In my current position, I don’t use much that I learned in college. What I do use isn’t directly from my major courses. However, I wouldn’t have gotten this job if I didn’t have my degree. It’s an entry level position, but my chances for advancement are greatly improved less by my degree and more by the skills I aquired getting it.

A person who went straight to the work force may be just as capable as me, but they’ll have to work longer to prove it to their employer. I’ve already got a written document saying I’ve proved it before.

]]>
By: Craig http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6489 Tue, 08 Sep 2009 13:23:41 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6489 The opportunity cost I grant you, but an analysis of student loans says more about the folly of borrowing than the wisdom of enrolling. Too many kids are borrowing $50,000 for an English Lit degree, and you don’t need an economist to tell you that makes no sense. There should be more emphasis on getting a useful degree at a solid school that you can afford–I’m convinced that _that_ is one of the best financial decisions people can make in their lifetimes.

]]>
By: Incentives http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6481 Tue, 08 Sep 2009 01:51:02 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6481 Another interesting study would be to compare part-time students with full-time students. I wonder if there is any difference in career advancement between these two groups.

]]>
By: David Neubie http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6472 Mon, 07 Sep 2009 15:03:33 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6472 1. Thanks for bring attention again to the fallacy of correlated variables. Sadly, most people with advanced degrees never seem to get it.

2. I often give the same advice to people about Business School. I’ve seen bankers take a career reversal of more than the two years they spent in business school to go. I advise that business school is only useful if you want a significant career change or a break from the working world.

]]>
By: American_Fool http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6465 Mon, 07 Sep 2009 03:10:09 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6465 My two cents. Not all college grads have what it takes, but the degree does mean something… I’ve supervised with and without, and in general, college educated kids are rarely useless, but kids w/o the degree are with a discouraging regularity. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve managed non-degreed standouts, and degreed people who definitely did not belong, but in general the degree means something. Now I personally made the decision not to go back and get my MBA – the cost benefit never made sense to me. Now, with all the off-shoring happening (right in front of my eyes, I’ve had a front row seat for the past 5 years)I may find that if I’m layed-off the lack of MBA does end up hurting me somewhat… maybe… but so far it hasn’t. One thing i do wonder, however, is whether the value of a college education is shrinking over time? Is it worth less, adjusted for inflation, than 30 years ago?

]]>
By: dWj http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6458 Sun, 06 Sep 2009 22:01:37 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6458 http://www.careerjoy.com/node/377 is the first reasonably decent link I can find — I have to run out now — but I seem to recall that it misrepresents the finding: people who *apply* to good schools end up doing as well as people who graduate from those schools, even if they’re rejected by those schools. Or so I recall. Maybe I can find a better link later.

]]>
By: fresno dan http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/comment-page-1/#comment-6457 Sun, 06 Sep 2009 21:59:20 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2009/09/05/the-value-of-a-college-education/#comment-6457 Haven’t we been down this road before, i.e., borrowing ever more money in the belief that our “investment” (housing or education) will always make money??? I mean, most college is paid for through loans, right?

]]>