Felix Salmon

The bank-recapitalization supertax

My colleague Peter Thal Larsen has an interesting take on the numbers associated with the UK banker supertax, and how a 50% tax on a £6 billion bonus pool can generate only £550 million in revenue:

Chart of the day, hedonic treadmill edition

Here’s my favorite pair of charts from David Kochanek’s latest hedge fund compensation report. The first shows how much people get paid, by job title:

Chart of the day: Credit card late fees

This chart comes from the Center for Responsible Lending’s latest report on the latest tricks and hidden fees in the credit card industry:

Is this just the beginning of a depression?

David Rosenberg, the former Merrill Lynch economist now at Gluskin Sheff, has another of his very bearish reports out, and kicks off with this observation:

Britain’s very modest surtax revenues

Andrew Clavell notes something very interesting about the amount of money the UK Treasury expects to raise from its bonus tax:

The behavioral economics of data consumption

I know that when you know how much electricity you’re using, you use less of it. But I always thought that was because the more electricity you use, the more you pay. In fact, it might just be a function of the fact that it’s being measured and reported back. I was puzzled by this story in today’s NYT:

Why can’t I hide my list of Facebook friends?

The sleazy anti-shorting crowd at Deep Capture has published a list of my facebook friends, along with those of other critics of the site like Barry Ritholtz, Dan Colarusso, Dave Kansas, David Einhorn, Eric Savitz, Henry Blodget, Jeff Matthews, Joe Nocera, Joe Weisenthal, John Carney, John Hempton, Paul Kedrosky, and Sam Antar.

Closing loopholes

Remember how Gary Gensler persuaded Barney Frank to close a big loophole in the derivatives-regulation legislation? I was hopeful then — poor, naive soul that I am — that the banking lobby had been effectively neutered on the loophole front.

Counterparties

A laid off i-banker applies to law school — McSweeney’s

Mexico’s Carstens moves from FinMin to Banxico. Where next, the OECD? — Reuters