Felix Salmon

Chart of the day: The big banks get bigger

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

marketshare.tiff

This chart comes from the Congressional Oversight Panel’s latest report, and it’s pretty self-explanatory. Here’s the COP’s gloss:

America’s broken colleges

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

Kevin Carey has a must-read and very sobering article on US higher education in the latest issue of Democracy. Basically, it isn’t working, for the vast majority of people who consume it, especially if they’re poor.

How investment banking is like a video game

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

Paul Kedrosky is nominally talking about a Swedish poker player, but really he could be talking about any number of i-bankers, hedge-funders, and private-equity types:

What happened to the W Union Square?

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

There are two reasons why it’s hard to report clearly on things like the foreclosure auction of the W Union Square. The first is that there is a very complicated capital structure, which journalists have difficulty explaining. And the second is that it’s really hard to resist ledes like this, in the WSJ:

Information consumption charts of the day

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

I love these charts, from a new paper (37-page PDF here) on how much information Americans consume each day:

Well done, Darling

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

To nobody’s surprise, bankers are complaining about the UK’s 50% supertax on their bonuses this year:

Counterparties

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

Bike racks in loading/parking areas, &/or bike rooms, are a great alternative to freight elevators, which stop running at 6pm — NYT

Why homes aren’t investments, cont.

By Felix Salmon
December 9, 2009

Do you ever get the feeling that you must be right about something just on the strength of how ludicrous people sound when they argue against you? Take this, in defense of housing-as-an-investment:

Did executive pay help cause the crisis?

By Felix Salmon
December 8, 2009

Lucian Bebchuk, Alma Cohen, and Holger Spamann explain how executive pay at investment banks helped precipitate the crisis: