Counterparties

By Felix Salmon
January 5, 2010
Telegraph

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Can someone please explain to me this week’s New Yorker cover? Are they meant to be standing at the end of a ski jump or something? — TNY

Was the rename from Burj Dubai to Burj Khalifa part of the UAE bailout of Dubai? — BusinessWeek

May the screwcap extend its gains in the 2010s: please let it be a majority of wine bottles in a few years — Wine Anorak

Do you really look at that sales clerk? An interesting experiment: Change Blindness — YouTube

Best Midtown Lunches of 2009 — Midtown Lunch

The $260 toaster arrives. Recession? What recession? — Telegraph

A gyroscopic front wheel to help kids learn to ride a bike. Watch the video — Gyrobike

Who will buy Johnny Apple’s bottles of ’45 Lafite? And how much of a premium will they fetch? — WaPo

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Comments
2 comments so far

New Yorker cover: You are right on the money with “Tintin in Tibet”

The ski jump probably alludes to the olympics, which brings us all together (mostly) for a loving (almost) apolitical time. The tiny red flags signify that china’s involved. The Yeti tracks are there, but a little blown over, and the camera is pointed mostly at us, suggesting that we are the Yeti. Not sure why the girls is gabbing on the cell phone, but it is clear that the two are more involved with what they themselves are doing than enjoying the experience of being with their partner. The skis are off, suggesting that they’re more into the skiing for fashion’s sake?

Posted by Uncle_Billy | Report as abusive

It’s just an attempt to ridicule over-reliance on modern technology. A couple of young skiers rode down to the end of the ski jump, but, instead of jumping as their ancestors would’ve done, they stop and pull out digital devices. The guy is taking a picture and the girl is talking on her cell, reminding us that men are more visual and women are more auditory.

Posted by Nameless | Report as abusive
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