Comments on: The puzzle of high-alcohol wines http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: nbenz1 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-11006 Sat, 09 Jan 2010 03:42:09 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-11006 I could not disagree with you more Mr. Simon. Please read my rebuttal,

http://tavolarosso.com/2010/01/higher-al cohol-levels-shouldnt-be-a-concern/

I would love to hear your comments

]]>
By: N.Mycroft http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10802 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 17:36:52 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10802 of course it is a global warming thing. look at regions on the climatic margins of grape production like the Mosel. for the last 200 years the pattern has been a great year or two when the weather was unusually warm and dry each decade. that the climate was warming quickly became obvious in the 1980s and 1990s via the behavior of glaciers + sea ice, shifts in maximum ranges of various organisms, etc. at the same time, it became obvious in the Mosel. from Robert Parker’s vintage chart; years rated 90 and above:

1971, 1975, 1976, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007.

see a pattern? same phenomenon visible in many other wine regions. warmer weather, longer growing season, riper grapes.

]]>
By: GingerYellow http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10794 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 14:57:05 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10794 “Most wine-lovers I know prefer it when wine’s in the 12% range: those wines might not do very well in blind tastings, but they go much better with food, they are much more likely to express terroir, and — not to put too fine a point on it — you can drink much more of them without waking up in the morning feeling as though a cat is trying to claw its way out of your head through your eyeballs.”

Maybe most wine isn’t bought by wine lovers, but by people who want to get drunk. On wine.

]]>
By: wcw http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10784 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 04:41:19 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10784 Who says it’s better now?

Also, how are rising sugar levels in grapes not tied to longer, warmer growing seasons?

]]>
By: maynardGkeynes http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10783 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 04:41:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10783 There is some thought that yeast strains are implicated. It has long been known that yeasts vary with regard to their efficiency — some strains convert more ethanol per gram of sugar. One theory is that DNA from the more efficient strains has infiltrated standardized yeast DNA, although the mechanism is not understood yet. The increasing popularity of wild strains, some of which may be more aggressive alcohol producers, may also be a factor.

]]>
By: egh http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10782 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 04:21:15 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10782 Thanks, nameless, I posted before I saw your message. You answer my (implied) question as to why the sugar level in grapes would have been rising.

]]>
By: egh http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10781 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 04:18:15 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10781 Do winemakers have the choice? I don’t know much about making wine, but a bit about beer. With beer you can easily adjust the amount of fermentable sugars (the largest variable determining the alcohol in the end product) to start with by adjusting your malt bill, but presumably the fermentable sugars in a must depends on the quality of the grapes? If consumers want a certain grape, and a certain balance of residual (unfermented) sugars and alcohol to give a wine a particular sweet/dry character, the only way to adjust the alcohol is by some sort of artificial means, either by watering down the must or by removing alcohol from the finished wine. But maybe I am missing something; as I said I know little about wine making.

]]>
By: Nameless http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10780 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 03:49:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10780 As the article says, the key parameter is the initial sugar level. If your initial grapes are too sweet for whatever reason, there’s no “traditional” method that would let you make a 12% dry wine from them without resorting to extreme measures. The choice is between making a sweet wine by aborting fermentation before all sugar is converted (by using yeast with lower alcohol tolerance), de-alcoholizing, or diluting the must with water.

Viticulturists are obviously interested in maximizing the sugar content of grapes without sacrificing aroma – it’s better to make a gallon of 18% wine and dilute it down to 14%, than to make a gallon of 14% wine from the same quantity of grapes.

]]>
By: q_is_too_short http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/comment-page-1/#comment-10778 Tue, 05 Jan 2010 03:12:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2010/01/05/the-puzzle-of-high-alcohol-wines/#comment-10778 i have an appointment at taralucci e vino tomorrow and may do exactly that.

]]>