Felix Salmon

Counterparties

Whole Foods shareholders fight back — Reuters

A spectacular fisking of Morgenson, by Bond Girl — Self-evident

Carlo McCormick on Alexandre Arrechea’s wrecking ball in Times Square — Artnet

Bloggers @ Treasury

Treasury had its second big blogger meeting today, where Tim Geithner and other Senior Administration Officials (sorry, ground rules) fielded questions from a group of bloggers* which tilted heavily towards the newsier end of the spectrum. The Center for American Progress was there in force, as were the Atlantic and the Huffington Post; the less corporate bloggers from last time round (David Merkel, Tyler Cowen, Yves Smith, Steve Waldman, John Jansen, Michael Panzer, Kid Dynamite) were absent this time.**

Job creation datapoints of the day

Lending to small businesses is often a spectacularly good way of creating jobs — and almost always creates more jobs per dollar spent than any kind of infrastructure investment. One can argue at length about just how many dollars it costs to create one job in the infrastructure field, but whatever numbers you come up with, they’re going to be much higher than, say, the numbers that Linda Levy, the CEO of Lower East Side People’s Federal Credit Union, gave me for our small-business lending. (I’m on the board there.)

Why it’s silly to blame CDS for Greece’s woes

Rajiv Sethi has a good blog entry taking issue with my view on credit default swaps, which The Money Demand does an equally good job of answering. But Rajiv then asks this question in the comments:

Organic wine datapoint of the day

Meg Sullivan has a good write-up of a paper by Magali Delmas and Laura Grant, which asks a simple question:

Link-phobic bloggers at the NYT and WSJ

Clark Hoyt, the NYT’s public editor, has a good post-mortem on l’affaire Zachary Kouwe, and asks whether “the culture of DealBook, the hyper-competitive news blog on which Kouwe worked” was partly to blame for his plagiarism.

The NYT jumps the CDS shark

If Paul Krugman and others want the New York Times to be the paper of record, especially when it comes to matters economic, they’re going to have to do better than this:

Iceland says no

Does any referendum, ever, get a 98% no vote — especially when it’s a referendum on a bill which was passed by a democratically-elected legislature? The first reaction is that the people have obviously spoken with one voice. But then the question arises: What have they said?

Counterparties

Vikram, you’re wrong. the drop in Citi stock was your fault. Not the fault of short sellers — Alphaville