Counterparties

By Felix Salmon
July 16, 2010
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Goldman had $27 billion in cash and short-term securities on March 31 — Footnoted

Chittum deftly fillets the WSJ’s poor effort on farmers and the fin reg bill — CJR

The behavioral psychology of IPOs — PsyFi

The Team America patch that helped get McChrystal in trouble — Atlantic

2,000 words on the mathematics of apportioning Congressional seats, and possible fixes — HNN

What does India’s new currency symbol symbolize? “It is just a symbol,” says the designer — Gulf News

The Alan Greenspan Chair of Economics at NYU Stern. For real — Ritholtz

Justin Fox’s plan for world domination continues on course — BusinessWire

Hans Rosling on global population growth. He’s a superstar. Watch this talk, it’s only 10 minutes. It’s great — TED

Paul Murphy explains how to use EDGAR. It’s non-trivial — Alphaville

Dan Ariely launches his Procrastinator app. I’m definitely not buying it today — Ariely

Notebooks from “the company the makes the paper for the Euro note”. Now 50% off. In dollar terms — DWR

Time to short WEIRD debt! — NYT

How to bike and be chic: ride the wrong way down the middle of a one-way street — WSJ

Ben Stein’s new book tells you to ignore Ben Stein. So I guess that’s one piece of good advice — Elfenbein

Argentina approves landmark gay marriage bill — Reuters

4 comments

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Felix, this is regarding India’s new symbol for its currency Rupee. The quote “It’s just a symbol” attributed by you to the designer was actually made by the Information and Broadcasting minister Ambika Soni as per Gulf News. Even that is incorrect. You are much better off picking Indian stories from Indian media to ensure accuracy. Here is the full and correct story http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/biz/i ndia-business/Indian-rupee-gets-a-symbol -joins-elite-currency-club/articleshow/6 171234.cms

Posted by s1s | Report as abusive

I find it odd that, after that history of congressional reapportionment, he leaves out the change in the forties to the current system (which avoids the Alabama paradox), leaving the impression that we still use the previous system.

I put together the web page posted at
http://tinyurl.com/2cpww9z
around 2001; it provides a very brief characterization of the modern method, but is mostly just numbers related to the last apportionment.

Posted by dWj | Report as abusive

Rosling’s self-loathing plan to turn the western world into some kind of chattel for the poorer world fails to take into account that most of the western world’s population is already starting to crash. He should have had cut the western box in half for the 2050 segment.

In any case, it seems Rosling confuses correlation with causation. Rosling clearly has the relationship backwards. If a country reduces its birthrate then it climbs out of poverty. All of the nations he emphasizes, China, India, Bangladesh and so on emphasized birth control first and became less poor next.

What if a country just receives wealth? Will that alone control its population? Quite the opposite. Saudi Arabia discovered oil in 1938 and established a welfare state. Its population went from 4 million in 1960 to 29 million today.
Have a look at this chart. Stunning.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Saudi- Arabia-demography.png

Rosling’s plan is a plan to get the developing world’s population to 10 or 15 billion. Eventually a nasty resource limit will be hit and the wealthier nations would have to ditch the poor to feed themselves. An ugly outcome indeed.

What liberals like you Felix always struggle to grasp is that free markets are usually the most merciful. Utopian it is not. Maybe you are too much of an optimist to be an economist.

Posted by DanHess | Report as abusive

Dan Hess, and I mean this in the most tasteful fashion possible, optimism’s the only way you can possibly call today’s Western economy a free one. People who live in glass houses, copulation control, etc.

Posted by HBC | Report as abusive