Counterparties

By Felix Salmon
November 30, 2010
Forbes

" data-share-img="" data-share="twitter,facebook,linkedin,reddit,google" data-share-count="true">

Early next year, a major American bank will suddenly find itself turned inside out. Tens of thousands of its internal documents will be exposed on Wikileaks — Forbes

Fiji Water announced today that it will close its operations in Fiji: Please let this be permanent — MoJo

Mary Meeker to Kleiner Perkins — WSJ

More From Felix Salmon
Post Felix
The Piketty pessimist
The most expensive lottery ticket in the world
The problems of HFT, Joe Stiglitz edition
Private equity math, Nuveen edition
Five explanations for Greece’s bond yield
Comments
3 comments so far

Well the Governments won’t do it, so hopefully there are unethical greedy guts churning in the banks after reading they might be exposed.

Sadly, the righteous plutocrats probably have no idea they did anything illegal as everyone was doing it… and they feel that anything they did was an economic boost, a capitalist gem, innovative market making and book keeping…

The house of cards is still up in the air and the Government is protecting Ponzi schemes, fictitious market trading, fraudulent financiers and it is time it ended and only revealing the truth and being transparent might curtail it.

Who knows, maybe regulations with teeth will come of it and the economy will have hope of recovery rather then simply ratcheting up more wealth for the rich at the expense of the those who aren’t.

Posted by hsvkitty | Report as abusive

I can’t decide whether I like WikiLeaks or whether it scares me s***less. It is absolutely has the potential to be destabilizing and disruptive, but then there are situations when disruption is necessary to force the government to take action.

Citibank, BoA, or Goldman Sachs? Or another bank entirely? I’m sure they all have plenty of skeletons in their closets.

Posted by TFF | Report as abusive

I agree it is entirely disruptive and a little scary because all countries veil information and value secrecy, but to me it is embarrassing because supposed diplomats were unable to say what is the truth in less brash tone.

That Diplomats are not diplomatic out of the public eye shows they are not as skilled as they should be, and that could damage diplomacy more then the breach. Perhaps people will be chosen for skills and not nepotism or political favours.

It seems Wikileaks had Bofa data for sometime, from an executives computer no less. Sounds like a few skeletons are rattling, or is that the sound of knees knocking as they tremble? One can only hope… and yes I make no bones about relishing banks that damaged the economy for greed being rattled to the core.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6A T40520101130?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNe ws

Posted by hsvkitty | Report as abusive
Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/