Comments on: Wall Street analysts deserve a “sell” rating http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/01/21/wall-street-analysts-deserve-a-sell-rating/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: ARJTurgot2 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/01/21/wall-street-analysts-deserve-a-sell-rating/comment-page-1/#comment-23450 Mon, 24 Jan 2011 01:07:28 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7044#comment-23450 I might read an analyst for his industry evaluation; I would never read an analyst for his buy/sell recommendation. Other than general observations on broad issues, I don’t trust any of these guys with my money.

I’m not sure on the degree of market Efficiency, which is an enormously complex question possibly beyond answer until much later in this century, but I’m sure that by the time I read any recommendation the market has had time to digest the information. Bargains take dis-equilibrium on a substantial scale.

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By: MaggiesFarmboy http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/01/21/wall-street-analysts-deserve-a-sell-rating/comment-page-1/#comment-23417 Sat, 22 Jan 2011 15:00:54 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7044#comment-23417 Excuse the cynicism, but isn’t this criticism akin to asking puppets to appear more life-like? Analyst “questions” are obviously designed to drive specific agendas. In this case, as the earlier comment demonstrates, both of these companies have to fit into “growth” storylines, because the market depends on them to lead tech higher.

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By: TFF http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/01/21/wall-street-analysts-deserve-a-sell-rating/comment-page-1/#comment-23416 Sat, 22 Jan 2011 13:46:58 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7044#comment-23416 I’ve been wondering, what exactly is “buy side” vs. “sell side” on Wall Street?

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By: TurtleBay http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/01/21/wall-street-analysts-deserve-a-sell-rating/comment-page-1/#comment-23402 Sat, 22 Jan 2011 03:04:27 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7044#comment-23402 It is a little bit disingenuous to pin the problem on Wall St. analysts being much happier with their spreadsheets than talking to real people. The analysts know that having Larry Page outline his understanding of business fundamentals and drawing comparisons to Schmidt is the most dangerous part of the call. If someone asked Larry a Finance 101 question and he completely flubs it, the stock could drop 5-10% instantly. That is why all of the analysts with “buy” ratings filled up the phone queue and asked soft balls.

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