Comments on: The case of Paul Brodeur vs the NYPL http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/04/05/the-case-of-paul-brodeur-vs-the-nypl/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: NJLib99 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/04/05/the-case-of-paul-brodeur-vs-the-nypl/comment-page-1/#comment-25768 Wed, 13 Apr 2011 21:42:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7821#comment-25768 This article fails to mention the declarations of Mimi Bowling, former curator of manuscripts at NYPL, that the collection was fully processed years earlier. NYPL executives have disputed her claims and according to Mr. Brodeur have even attempted to defame her.

I find it hard to believe that a curator of such stature would “lie” about a collection. If it was indeed processed, then what right does the library have to edit the content years later?

So many concerns are raised here. There must be a declaration of why the content was thrown out and by whom. Remaining faithful to the provenance of a collection is the reason archives are invaluable resources.

Democratic information retrieval requires those who combat against document tampering whether its for space or for some sinister reason.

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By: RogerS http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/04/05/the-case-of-paul-brodeur-vs-the-nypl/comment-page-1/#comment-25675 Thu, 07 Apr 2011 23:08:17 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7821#comment-25675 NYPL maintain that “Our deed of gift, which Mr. Brodeur signed, was clear.” Is a copy available? If Mr Brodeur agreed to this behaviour by the NYPL, to my mind he does not have a case.

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By: GRRR http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/04/05/the-case-of-paul-brodeur-vs-the-nypl/comment-page-1/#comment-25599 Tue, 05 Apr 2011 17:40:21 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7821#comment-25599 Talk with Google to place the entire collection (assuming he didn’t pass copyrights on to the NYPL) into a copy-free or copyright-free assets. Then give the remaining 80% to Google Books to scan; Google can formally request to have access to the remaining 20% held by the NYPL, and scan it, too. Combined once and for all, accessible to billions of people all around the world, not just in NY.

Or not.

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By: RobSterling http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/04/05/the-case-of-paul-brodeur-vs-the-nypl/comment-page-1/#comment-25595 Tue, 05 Apr 2011 14:37:35 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=7821#comment-25595 Can’t they just scan and then destroy or return the unwanted 80%? Why is storage space an issue?

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