Opinion

Felix Salmon

Counterparties

By Felix Salmon
April 25, 2011

An aerial-photography history of Chicago, 1985 to 2010 — Chicago Tribune

Burkhard Bilger’s profile of David Eagleman is one of the great magazine articles of all time — TNY

“The weak form of Arrow’s Theorem is that any result can be published no more than five times. The strong form is that every result will be published five times.” — Gelman

The hateful Jonathan Franzen — FS

“Things White People Like” should really be renamed “Things Mac People Like” — Hunchblog

Is the NYT paywall a strategic move in peacetime or a tactical move in wartime? — Ben’s blog

“The proper effect of philosophy is to make people exquisitely alert to their assumptions, sensitive to the rigor of their analyses, and—truth be told—permanently uncomfortable about the validity of their conclusions.” — TED

Scrabble, explained — Dinosaur Comics

Agency theory of nonprofits — Guan

Getting Shot by an RPG: My first reflection on conflict photography — Sebastian Meyer

Sebastian Junger Remembers Tim Hetherington — VF

Vancouver Bubble Watch: 25-Person Bidding War — Kedrosky

Wherein the World Economic Forum goes beyond parody — Tumblr

Banking Groups Stir Consumer Fears on Debit Card Regulations via Twitter — ProPublica

Comments
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“The proper effect of philosophy is to make people exquisitely alert to their assumptions, sensitive to the rigor of their analyses, and—truth be told—permanently uncomfortable about the validity of their conclusions.”

That would be the end of religion, the Republican Party et al.

Posted by walt9316 | Report as abusive
 

walt9316 — I know many bright people of different religions — I don’t question their intelligence, but your statement quoted from TED (intellectual lightweights, in my opinion) would not be true for them. I rarely question the wisdom of those who disagree with me, but I disagree with their presuppositions, and all philosophy has presuppositions.

People who are anti-religion have an axe to grind. They know judgment is coming against them when they die, and so they spit against it, while God laughs in Heaven (Psalm 2). It’s the only way to keep an even disposition on the road to Hell. I say this with a smile, because I appreciate anyone willing to make a statement about religion/God publicly.

But what will you do in the end, when you face Jesus at the Last Judgment, and he says to you, “Go, stand with the goats who are going to Hell.” This isn’t a mere question of philosophy, where people may easily differ. God revealed himself through over 40 men who wrote the Bible, agreeing with each other over a 2000 year stretch, culminating with his Son, who died for the sins of his elect people.

Now this is a real story. Tight, fascinating. Not like Islam, where you have to take the word of one man as truth. God doesn’t work that way, lest any mere man receive undue honor.

Sorry for being prolix. If you need, you can reach me at david.merkel@gmail.com.

Posted by DavidMerkel | Report as abusive
 

David, I am unabashedly Catholic (by choice, as an adult, not by upbringing).

One of the pieces that set me along this path was “The Great Divorce” by CS Lewis. Even to an agnostic (at least to one of Christian background), there was visible truth in the attitudes and principles expressed in this book.

Naturally much of the rest depends on faith and faith alone.

Posted by TFF | Report as abusive
 

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