Counterparties

By Nick Rizzo
August 31, 2011

The bounty that law firms pay for a Supreme Court clerk is up to $280,000. That’s a lot of money: more than any of the justices make, but less than Warren Buffett, whose Chief of Staff has the best business card ever.

Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly tried to get his wife’s boyfriend investigated by the police, Gawker claims.

Robert Shiller argues we can do stimulus without adding to debt.

Groupon’s unique visits fell 8.9% to 30.6 million in July, says Compete. LivingSocial saw an even faster decrease of 28% to 10.6 million.

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2 comments so far

Here’s one back for you…Oh the irony of narcissist Conrad Black being interviewed by Vanity Fair to express his new found humility…

A few tasty quotes:

On prison life:
“I see it as a temporary vocation.” To which he adds, “I quickly developed alliances with the Mafia people, Black says, then the Cubans. I was friendly with the ‘good ol’ boys’ and the African-Americans. They all understood I had fought the system, and I do believe I earned their respect for that.”

On how he will survive after his release: “I can live on $80 million. At least I think I can”

On publicly held companies: “The regulators, the minority shareholders, all that crap. Oh, I can’t stand it.”

http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2 011/08/vanity-fair-exclusive–conrad-blac k-on-life-in-prison–maintaini

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