Comments on: Why Mark Zuckerberg shouldn’t listen to management gurus http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: killad1508 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-37697 Mon, 09 Apr 2012 00:34:22 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-37697 You’re absolutely right!

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By: Curmudgeon http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35892 Sun, 12 Feb 2012 19:55:43 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35892 @handleym, that’s not a coding problem, it’s a math problem. That’s the sort of thing I’m good at :) .

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By: handleym http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35891 Sun, 12 Feb 2012 19:29:41 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35891 @Curmudgeon:
“but it’s never been clear to me that Facebook is anything about having the best coders. There aren’t difficult technical problems to solve at Facebook, ”

Oh my, you are so wrong.
The fact that it SEEMS like Facebook is easy doesn’t mean it actually is. Facebook has a problem basically as hard as Google’s — looking for correlations and patterns in a VAST amount of data. Facebook, for whatever reason, hasn’t made as public a point of its computational nous, compared to, say Google, but talk to people in Silicon Valley…

Take just two example (which are on the public side of the Faecbook ledger): Prineville and Hiphop. Both of these, very different, are not the products of a bunch of amateurs.

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By: jay_dilley http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35890 Sun, 12 Feb 2012 17:37:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35890 Jack nails it. He recognises that business are organisations that made up of people and as much as each group wants to think they are special, they’re really not that different at all and Facebook will run into the boring problems that all organisations face as it grows. Becoming #1 is easier than staying there.

His insight is what most people are missing, labour supply with newfound wealth is backwards bending –Economics. Jack is saying that the guy that is now worth 1 or 2M but gets paid 100 or 150K will re-evaluate how much time/effort he spends working, his ultimate performance will decrease b/c he now has the financial wherewithal to do other things and the value of that extra dollar from working isn’t enough to keep him working, instead there is a shift to enjoy leisure time.

Regardless of the utility he used to receive from his job, money changes that for most people; unless of course you’re truly the founder, visionary or other principal of the organisation. Jack is saying that there will be wealthy people who no longer have the same passion as they did before, they will show up and work but they will lack that burning desire to push the company forward and keep it #1. Look at any sport to see how it works.

Nothing kills performance more than deadweight on your team, in the beginning everyone was working their assess off towards a goal, now that they have achieved it, priorities change. The next generation of Facebook employees needs to have incentives; otherwise they will find a start up where they can pour their efforts into.

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By: Altoid http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35879 Sun, 12 Feb 2012 04:34:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35879 “legal CYA when issues come up.” Yep, mostly.

This is the same Welch who’s described in glowing terms the wonders of getting rid of 10% of his management periodically, regardless of abilities or where people are in their lives, just so nobody gets too comfortable. So the goal in surviving these reviews is evidently to set aside enough to job-hunt or retire on before you burn out, or to get high enough on the ladder to get nice and comfy. I must say that whenever I’ve seen Welch in any public setting he’s always impressed me with an enormous degree of self-satisfaction, or self-congratulation, above anything else.

And I’m not sure this is so far removed from the management school that said “if it ain’t broke, break it.” Which I experienced in action, and which ultimately is a tool to achieve managerial totalitarianism.

I do seem to recall that GE’s big successes under Welch were mostly in finance rather than manufacturing, and it’s interesting to see that Immelt is making a big deal of actually investing in domestic manufacturing for a change. I think Welch was fortunate in his timing as much as in anything else.

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By: Donnyg16 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35877 Sat, 11 Feb 2012 23:03:25 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35877 I would not listen to management gurus easier because they are usually just in it for the money and end up destroying the morals of the company.

http://assistanceforsinglemothers.com/

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By: Moopheus http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35872 Sat, 11 Feb 2012 15:00:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35872 I work at a fairly large institution, and my impression is that performance reviews are done so that HR managers in the HR office can feel like they’re doing something to keep track of the employees, and also as legal CYA when issues come up. Your own manager–the guy you report to and work with–does not need a review to know whether or not you’re doing your job.

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By: AngryInCali http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35870 Sat, 11 Feb 2012 13:30:24 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35870 If they hired the right people up to now, the IPO won’t mean a drastic change in culture. Jack understands finance/sales, not engineering, and certainly not creative engineering (i.e. software/internet).

You nailed it Felix. Good work.

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By: WeWereWallSt http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35868 Sat, 11 Feb 2012 11:43:48 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35868 Felix, please break onto the set next week when Jack and Suzy are on, apologize, then bring your letter of resignation to your boss and tell him you can’t work any longer at a place where you’re not let in on the jokes.

Jack Welch ran the country’s largest manufacturer for a couple of decades. He has to be aghast watching our industrial base be replaced by useless, mind-numbing, time-wasting advertising funnels, like Facebook, Groupon, Zynga, and all the rest of the pump-and-dump crap Sand Hill Road is pimping — again.

Any “help” Jack can offer that helps put that ridiculous piece of American “industry” out of its misery sooner rather than later is a patriotic service to the rest of us.

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By: nooob http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/02/10/why-mark-zuckerberg-shouldnt-listen-to-management-gurus/comment-page-1/#comment-35864 Sat, 11 Feb 2012 02:41:56 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=12168#comment-35864 Please leave facebook’s business to Mark, he knows it better than any other half wits’s

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