Comments on: Counterparties: Are you sick of Facebook yet? http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/05/16/counterparties-are-you-sick-of-facebook-yet/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Overcast451 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/05/16/counterparties-are-you-sick-of-facebook-yet/comment-page-1/#comment-39167 Thu, 17 May 2012 22:04:25 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=14116#comment-39167 But the big question is – often – do you believe the Analysts?

Oh but yes, the news is quite annoying. It’s not *that* big of a deal. I think many are hoping for Google 2.0, but don’t think we’ll see quite that.

]]>
By: LadyGodiva http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/05/16/counterparties-are-you-sick-of-facebook-yet/comment-page-1/#comment-39145 Thu, 17 May 2012 13:56:58 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=14116#comment-39145 Re Facebook and future regulations, it would be nice to know which of our upstanding legislators invest in the stock, as their financial interests should not interfere with their duty to protect our civil rights as citizens. Of course, they could always put on some “naked shorts” ahead of any regulatory bombshell. Either way, it is waaayy too much temptation to put in front of the greedy buggers, IMHO.

]]>
By: realist50 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/05/16/counterparties-are-you-sick-of-facebook-yet/comment-page-1/#comment-39134 Thu, 17 May 2012 02:20:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=14116#comment-39134 Great FT link regarding Facebook’s prospects and valuation.

One downside risk not mentioned by the FT is the regulatory, stroke of a pen risk. The FT notes the lock-in effect of Facebook because of its control of users’ histories, photographs, relationships, and other data. What happens, however, if Facebook is successful in remaining the dominant social network and is seen to be enjoying monopoly profits as a result of that position, while continuing periodically to annoy some percent of users with its privacy policies and monetization strategies? Does legislation then pass that reduces Facebook’s profitability? I could foresee requirements for Facebook to make it easy for users to transfer data elsewhere, or treating it as a digital age common carrier obligated to allow access to competitors on less profitable terms, or limitations to its ability to bundle new features and services with its dominant platform. All of these moves have historical precedents – cellphone number portability, incumbent telephone carriers and CLEC’s, and Microsoft’s antitrust fights related to bundling new features into Windows. I don’t expect regulation to kill Facebook, but I could see de facto regulatory limits on its market share and profitability.

]]>