Comments on: Why fuel-economy standards make sense http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: methew http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-49029 Mon, 13 Jan 2014 09:24:42 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-49029 Bade Newby showcases wonderful self sticker and window stickers in UK. Our custom sticker are printed on quality white vinyl with guarantee of more than 3 years. Visit our site today to know more about our organizations or call us at 01509 412 228.

]]>
By: ABT http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-43113 Thu, 13 Sep 2012 22:18:36 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-43113 I live in the UK and most people I knew had wondered why SUVs were so popular in America.

Then I did a 3 week roadtrip around California / Arizona / Nevade earlier this year.

The roads are terrible. We were driving a 2013 Lincoln MKS which for the most part was extremely comfortable yet we spent most of the journey bouncing up and down. Even the interstates are covered in pot holes. They are easily the worst roads any of us have ever driven on. If I actually lived there and had to drive on them frequently I don’t think there would be any choice other than to get something like a Range Rover.

]]>
By: ABT http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-43097 Thu, 13 Sep 2012 21:28:54 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-43097 I live in the UK and most people I knew had wondered why SUVs were so popular in America.

Then I did a 3 week roadtrip around California / Arizona / Nevade earlier this year.

The roads are terrible. We were driving a 2013 Lincoln MKS which for the most part was extremely comfortable yet we spent most of the journey bouncing up and down. Even the interstates are covered in pot holes. They are easily the worst roads any of us have ever driven on. If I actually lived there and had to drive on them frequently I don’t think there would be any choice other than to get something like a Range Rover.

]]>
By: Sechel http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-43068 Thu, 13 Sep 2012 09:49:24 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-43068 The New York Times ran the more correct counter-argument that fuel economy standards do not make sense and that the correct policy response to promoting fuel economy should be a gasoline surcharge(http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09  /12/business/fuel-efficiency-standards- have-costs-of-their-own.html?_r=2&ref=bu siness&pagewanted=all). Higher fuel standards make new cars more expensive, do not alter driving habits and keep older cars on the road longer. A tax on gasoline would shift driving habits, by encouraging alternative transportation, less driving or the purchase of a more fuel efficient vehicle. Simply raising fuel efficiency standards may have more people driving on the road longer and be counter-productive. I also can’t help thinking that the bean counters who calculate the CPI will decide car prices are flat and attribute it to “hedonism” and say we benefited from lower smog etc erasing the higher prices from gov’t data.

]]>
By: Sechel http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-43067 Thu, 13 Sep 2012 09:47:18 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-43067 The New York Times ran the more correct counter-argument that fuel economy standards do not make sense and that the correct policy response to promoting fuel economy should be a gasoline surcharge(http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09  /12/business/fuel-efficiency-standards- have-costs-of-their-own.html?_r=2&ref=bu siness&pagewanted=all). Higher fuel standards make new cars more expensive, do not alter driving habits and keep older cars on the road longer. A tax on gasoline would shift driving habits, by encouraging alternative transportation, less driving or the purchase of a more fuel efficient vehicle. Simply raising fuel efficiency standards may have more people driving on the road longer and be counter-productive. I also can’t help thinking that the bean counters who calculate the CPI will decide car prices are flat and attribute it to “hedonism” and say we benefited from lower smog etc erasing the higher prices from gov’t data.

]]>
By: y2kurtus http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-43060 Thu, 13 Sep 2012 02:03:24 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-43060 “But that’s no reason at all not to implement higher fuel-economy standards as well.”

No worse then telling a farmer in Iowa how much wheat he is allowed to grow on his own land for his own consumption. The commerce clause has been expanded to the point that the goverment can claim that a hydroelectric dam is an emmiter because of the water they let through, that some light bulbs that cost .25 cents per should be banned so that people will buy ones that cost 2$ per which flicker for 30 seconds when you flip the switch.

Taxes are a neccessary evil if you want national defence and secure borders, and cradle to grave healthcare.

Mandates are not.

]]>
By: Eericsonjr http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/12/why-fuel-economy-standards-make-sense/comment-page-1/#comment-43053 Wed, 12 Sep 2012 18:11:25 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17518#comment-43053 Higher taxes and big gummit mandates are both needed to make U.S. car mfgs do the right thing: defy U.S. consumers.

For some reason, Americans have built into our entitled sense of exceptionalism the idea that 7-liter V8s developing 600 horsepower are a birthright, to be wedged optionally or as standard equipment into every two-bit pickup truck, SUV and red “sports car” those Detroit knuckleheads produce. Hot-rodder madness is in our DNA, somehow, and it needs to be excised.

We have the technology to get 50mpg average out of everything we build–using recently developed 200-hp four-bangers. But we need to take about 600 pounds of useless junk out of every passenger car to get there.

Normal U.S.-market sedans these days weigh two tons. That’s about 600 pounds more than they weighed in the early 1970s, and there’s no good reason for it.

Mandate and tax, for sure. Americans are like a mule when it comes to these things.

]]>