Comments on: Eli Broad’s inverted vision http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: artemundi http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43378 Sun, 23 Sep 2012 13:52:58 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43378 Altruism, social responsibility, philanthropy. A collector also has to think about preserving his/her vision for generations to come. I do not see how Broad could be critisized for manipulating the press and sending out a decoy to the art community in order to preserve his legacy. No one would have done it for him. What bothers me is the fact that he has amassed a department store collection that lacks pluralism, and is a dull dialogue with what truly goes on in the world of contemporary art.

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By: Twinkbait http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43348 Fri, 21 Sep 2012 03:55:41 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43348 “The Broad” is merely a kind of parallel to the “Levitated Mass” and will be seen as equally ridiculous in time.

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By: EasyTruth http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43344 Thu, 20 Sep 2012 22:12:10 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43344 The truth of the matter is that scholars very rarely study art works in the Broad lending library and the art foundation declines as many loan requests as it approves for capricious reasons. It rarely lends to smaller institutions that would benefit from the exposure of the work to smaller audiences, unless there is a benefit to the Foundation in doing so. If a museum is insignificant in their eyes, the loans are declined. This is counter to the mission statement, but an excuse is always at the ready to defend the decision. The Foundation operates in a bipolar manner, a reason to collect massive amounts of art work with the appearance of being benevolent to the art world and artists when in fact it’s a fiefdom run at the whim of a few people who wrongly believe they have enormous influence and power in the art world. The veil is wearing thin and transparency is beginning to show through.

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By: EasyTruth http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43343 Thu, 20 Sep 2012 22:09:59 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43343 The truth of the matter is that scholars very rarely study art works in the Broad lending library and the art foundation declines as many loan requests as it approves for capricious reasons. It rarely lends to smaller institutions that would benefit from the exposure of the work to smaller audiences, unless there is a benefit to the Foundation in doing so. If a museum is insignificant in their eyes, the loans are declined. This is counter to the mission statement, but an excuse is always at the ready to defend the decision. The Foundation operates in a bipolar manner, a reason to collect massive amounts of art work with the appearance of being benevolent to the art world and artists when in fact it’s a fiefdom run at the whim of a few people who wrongly believe they have enormous influence and power in the art world. The veil is wearing thin and transparency is beginning to show through.

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By: AngryInCali http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43339 Thu, 20 Sep 2012 19:56:55 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43339 And of course, MOCA isn’t really a museum with a great collection, as I understand it. But it was the only big museum that needed Broad’s money so desperately that they’d give up control to him.

Your idea of a foundation that only lends works has some fundamental issues, but is a really interesting idea. In this era when almost all museums shows try to get a tour going, I wonder if there is a museum that is almost there, showing its works to more people away from itself than at home.

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By: QCIC http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43330 Thu, 20 Sep 2012 17:54:12 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43330 Rich person found more concerned with their own desires and ego than their previous claims of virtue and philanthropy.

Also on at 10 tonight “water is wet” and “dog bites man”.

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By: Chris08 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/09/20/eli-broads-inverted-vision/comment-page-1/#comment-43321 Thu, 20 Sep 2012 15:34:16 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=17955#comment-43321 I have always regarded modern art as the equivalent of mediaeval relics. In the Middle Ages relics (bones often of saints or bones thought to be those of saints) commanded immense prices and were avidly sought after. You can see many still covered with dust in cathedrals, etc., in Europe. But as medieval faith declined and waned so did the zest for relics until today I doubt any of them would be accepted by Sotheby’s for sale. In due time I also expect the same to happen to most of modern art: it will linger in the corners of dusty museums devoted to something else more important.

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