Comments on: How resilient is New York City? http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/ A slice of lime in the soda Sun, 26 Oct 2014 19:05:02 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: traduceri daneza http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-53617 Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:00:51 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-53617 On the other hand, A radioactive compound was ever coursing being a their health coming to receptors within his or her thought processes tissues. A sound fulblessed the bedroom once equally the world slid about a doughnut formed gap through a chemistry of the mental performance reader. In the event that ones verification experienced after that looked into, Pink and light green strips been seen intense to their minds, Producing affect..

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By: TFF http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44350 Fri, 02 Nov 2012 00:10:29 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44350 In theory, Fed purchase of bonds should reduce private-sector interest in the bonds. But that reduction is by less than the amount the Fed is adding to the markets.

In practice, I wonder if this still applies? There is a ridiculous amount of “dumb money” in the markets. Felix is proud that his money follows the market averages. Most large institutional money managers do the same, whether or not they admit to it. My guess is that most of the money in the system is attempting to track the index rather than attempting to make wise choices.

In such an environment, a new purchaser buying $1B of a particular issue might lead the “me too” purchasers to purchase an additional $2B or more of that issue, simply in an attempt to track the index?

It isn’t that simple, of course. It is never that simple. But is there another theory that explains the observed persistent irrationality in the markets? As best I can tell, people are buying bonds these days simply because they are there, not because they believe the risk/reward balance is favorable.

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By: Moopheus http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44345 Thu, 01 Nov 2012 18:26:15 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44345 GKMPerth–It would be interesting to see a million bikes trying to get over the Brooklyn Bridge. Even with the car lanes given over to bikes, it would be a challenge. This is a big problem for NYC–it’s basically a group of islands with fragile connections that become chokepoints when they fail (and they do–a hard rain can knock out the subway).

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By: JW_Mason http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44333 Thu, 01 Nov 2012 01:21:10 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44333 Same question as Auros — in what world does additional demand for an asset cause its price to fall? Do you also believe that current Fed purchases of mortgage backed securities is making mortgages more expensive? If not, what’s the difference?

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By: GKMPerth http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44331 Thu, 01 Nov 2012 01:04:19 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44331 Bicycles. You can ride a bike through just about anything bar flooding. And it uses less petrol than my cats do. And if push comes to shove- and it might – you get can get two up on a bike. It’s so simple it’s almost stupid.

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By: Kaleberg http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44330 Thu, 01 Nov 2012 00:29:53 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44330 The savings would come from going around the usual underwriters on Wall Street who always overcharge for public infrastructure debt and will just use the debt for arbitrage games. The cities and agencies would get a better deal on capital and the Fed would actually be doing something to boost the economy rather than keeping our obsolete financial sector on life support.

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By: rjs0 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44329 Thu, 01 Nov 2012 00:09:24 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44329 Occupy Sandy: Occupy Wall Street Helps Storm Victims

http://jdeanicite.typepad.com/i_cite/201 2/10/occupy-sandy-occupy-wall-street-hel ps-storm-victims-the-nation.html

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By: Auros http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44327 Wed, 31 Oct 2012 23:36:26 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44327 “once the Fed stepped in, the chances are that no one else would lend, and private financing of public infrastructure would actually go down rather than up.”

Could you explain the thinking behind this statement? It seems to me that knowing that there’s a gigantic potential buyer for infrastructure bonds makes holding them more attractive, not less. If the Fed actually bids the price up / yield down to the point that they buy up the whole supply (which seems unlikely), that doesn’t mean that if/when they decide to stop buying new issues, or selling their holdings back into the market, there won’t be some price/yield at which the market is willing to soak the assets back up. Our current problem is that there is TOO MUCH demand for safe assets with steady yield. If infrastructure bonds are generally perceived as a relatively safe asset, and they come with the additional safety valve that we believe the Fed will support prices, that surely is a win on all fronts — good monetary policy, repair of critical infrastructure (which is an issue all over the country, not just storm-ravaged NYC), and fiscal stimulus.

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By: TechMarketeer http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2012/10/31/how-resilient-is-new-york-city/comment-page-1/#comment-44326 Wed, 31 Oct 2012 22:13:43 +0000 https://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/?p=19283#comment-44326 Nice article and a very valid point, Felix. This hurricane rises the concern that having a Backup and Recovery plan is critical these days. Besides significant property damage, Hurricane Sandy will cost billions of dollars in lost business, and partial or complete data loss from companies’ on-site datacenters.

It’s an unfortunate lesson to have to learn the hard way, especially this hard way. But, natural disasters like hurricanes, floods or superstorms are dramatic examples of the value of cloud solutions when it comes to resiliency in the face of a catastrophe, and the ability to recover and resume operations as quickly as possible.

Here is an article that talks about some of the ways that how cloud Technology can help rebound after the unforeseen / Sandy hurricane:

http://www.dincloud.com/blog/cloud-backu p-disaster-recovery-vs-hurricane-superst orm-and-more

It’s a unique way to look at cloud technology, and I think you’ll find this approach more in line with running a resilient business.

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